Avamys鼻眼適

Avamys Special Precautions

fluticasone

Manufacturer:

GlaxoSmithKline

Distributor:

Zuellig
/
Agencia Lei Va Hong
Full Prescribing Info
Special Precautions
Based on data with another glucocorticoid metabolised by CYP3A4, co-administration with ritonavir is not recommended because of the potential risk of increased systemic exposure to fluticasone furoate. (See Interactions).
Systemic effects with nasal corticosteroids have been reported, particularly at high doses prescribed for prolonged periods. These effects are much less likely to occur than with oral corticosteroids and may vary in individual patients and between different corticosteroid preparations. A reduction in growth velocity has been observed in children treated with fluticasone furoate 110 micrograms daily for one year (see Adverse Reactions and Pharmacology: Clinical Studies under Actions). Therefore, children should be maintained on the lowest dose which delivers adequate symptom control (see Dosage & Administration). As with other intranasal corticosteroids, physicians should be alert to potential systemic steroid effects including ocular changes (see Pharmacology: Clinical Studies under Actions).
Effects on Ability to Drive and Use Machines: Based on the pharmacology of fluticasone furoate and other intranasally administered steroids, there is no reason to expect an effect on ability to drive or to operate machinery with AVAMYS Nasal Spray.
Renal impairment: Fluticasone furoate is not detectable in urine from healthy volunteers after intranasal dosing. Less than 1% of dose - related material is excreted in urine and therefore renal impairment would not be expected to affect the pharmacokinetics of fluticasone furoate.
Hepatic impairment: There are no data with intranasal fluticasone furoate in patients with hepatic impairment. Data are available following inhaled administration of fluticasone furoate (as fluticasone furoate or fluticasone furoate/vilanterol) to subjects with hepatic impairment that are also applicable for intranasal dosing. A study of a single 400 microgram dose of orally inhaled fluticasone furoate in patients with moderate hepatic impairment (Child-Pugh B) resulted in increased Cmax (42%) and AUC(0-∞) (172%) and a modest (on average 23%) decrease in cortisol levels in patients compared to healthy subjects. Following repeat dosing of orally inhaled fluticasone furoate/vilanterol for 7 days, there was an increase in fluticasone furoate systemic exposure (on average two-fold as measured by AUC(0-24)) in subjects with moderate or severe hepatic impairment (Child-Pugh B or C) compared with healthy subjects. The increase in fluticasone furoate systemic exposure in subjects with moderate hepatic impairment (fluticasone furoate/vilanterol 200/25 micrograms) was associa ted with an average 34% reduction in serum cortisol compared with healthy subjects. There was no effect on serum cortisol in subjects with severe hepatic impairment (fluticasone furoate/vilanterol 100/12.5 micrograms).
Based on these findings the average p redicted exposure of 110 micrograms of intranasal fluticasone furoate in this patient population would not be expected to result in suppression of cortisol.
Other pharmacokinetic: Fluticasone furoate is typically not quantifiable (less than 10 picograms/mL) following intranasal dosing of 110 micrograms once daily. Quantifiable levels were only observed in less than 31% of patients aged 12 years and above and in less than 16% of paediatric patients following intranasal dosing of 110 micrograms once daily. There was no evidence for gender, age (including paediatrics), or race to be related to those subjects with quantifiable levels, when compared to those without.
Use in Elderly: Only a small number of elderly subjects (n=23/872; 2.6%) provided pharmacokinetic data. There was no evidence for a higher incidence of subjects with quantifiable fluticasone furoate concentrations in the elderly, when compared to the younger subjects.
Use in Children: Fluticasone furoate is typically not quantifiable (less than 10 picograms/mL) following intranasal dosing of 110 micrograms once daily. Quantifiable levels were observed in less than 16% of paediatric patients - following intranasal dosing of 110 micrograms once daily and only less than 7% of paediatric patients following 55 micrograms once daily. There was no evidence for a higher incidence of quantifiable levels of fluticasone furoate in younger children (less than 6 years of age).
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