L-Stafloxin

L-Stafloxin Special Precautions

levofloxacin

Manufacturer:

Stellapharm

Distributor:

HK Medical Supplies
/
Health Express
Full Prescribing Info
Special Precautions
Methicillin resistant S. aureus are very likely to possess co-resistance to fluoroquinolones, including levofloxacin. Therefore levofloxacin is not recommended for the treatment of known or suspected MRSA infections unless laboratory results have confirmed susceptibility of the organism to levofloxacin (and commonly recommended antibacterial agents for the treatment of MRSA-infections are considered inappropriate).
Levofloxacin may be used in the treatment of Acute Bacterial Sinusitis and Acute Exacerbation of Chronic Bronchitis when these infections have been adequately diagnosed.
Resistance to fluoroquinolones of E. coli - the most common pathogen involved in urinary tract infections. Prescribers are advised to take into account the local prevalence of resistance in E. coli to fluoroquinolones.
Inhalation Anthrax: Use in humans is based on in vitro Bacillus anthracis susceptibility data and on animal experimental data together with limited human data. Treating physicians should refer to national and/or international consensus documents regarding the treatment of anthrax.
Tendinitis and tendon rupture: Tendinitis may rarely occur. It most frequently involves the Achilles tendon and may lead to tendon rupture. The risk of tendinitis and tendon rupture is increased in patients aged over 60 years, in patients receiving daily doses of 1000 mg and in patients using corticosteroids. The daily dose should be adjusted in elderly patients based on creatinine clearance. Close monitoring of these patients is therefore necessary if they are prescribed levofloxacin. All patients should consult their physician if they experience symptoms of tendinitis. If tendinitis is suspected, treatment with levofloxacin must be halted immediately, and appropriate treatment (e.g. immobilisation) must be initiated for the affected tendon.
Clostridium difficile-associated disease: Diarrhoea, particularly if severe, persistent and/or bloody, during or after treatment with levofloxacin (including several weeks after treatment), may be symptomatic of Clostridium difficile-associated disease (CDAD). CDAD may range in severity from mild to life threatening, the most severe form of which is pseudomembranous colitis. It is therefore important to consider this diagnosis in patients who develop serious diarrhoea during or after treatment with levofloxacin. If CDAD is suspected or confirmed, levofloxacin should be stopped immediately and appropriate treatment initiated without delay. Anti-peristaltic medicinal products are contraindicated in this clinical situation.
Patients predisposed to seizures: Quinolones may lower the seizure threshold and may trigger seizures. Levofloxacin is contraindicated in patients with a history of epilepsy and, as with other quinolones, should be used with extreme caution in patients predisposed to seizures or concomitant treatment with active substances that lower the cerebral seizure threshold, such as theophylline. In case of convulsive seizures, treatment with levofloxacin should be discontinued.
Patients with G-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency: Patients with latent or actual defects in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity may be prone to haemolytic reactions when treated with quinolone antibacterial agents. Therefore, if levofloxacin has to be used in these patients, potential occurrence of haemolysis should be monitored.
Patients with renal impairment: Since levofloxacin is excreted mainly by the kidneys, the dose of Levofloxacin should be adjusted in patients with renal impairment.
Hypersensitivity reactions: Levofloxacin can cause serious, potentially fatal hypersensitivity reactions (e.g. angioedema up to anaphylactic shock), occasionally following the initial dose. Patients should discontinue treatment immediately and contact their physician or an emergency physician, who will initiate appropriate emergency measures.
Severe bullous reactions: Cases of severe bullous skin reactions such as Stevens-Johnson syndrome or toxic epidermal necrolysis have been reported with levofloxacin. Patients should be advised to contact their doctor immediately prior to continuing treatment if skin and/or mucosal reactions occur.
Dysglycaemia: As with all quinolones, disturbances in blood glucose, including both hypoglycaemia and hyperglycaemia have been reported, usually in diabetic patients receiving concomitant treatment with an oral hypoglycaemic agent (e.g., glibenclamide) or with insulin. Cases of hypoglycaemic coma have been reported. In diabetic patients, careful monitoring of blood glucose.
Prevention of photosensitisation: Photosensitisation has been reported with levofloxacin. It is recommended that patients should not expose themselves unnecessarily to strong sunlight or to artificial UV rays (e.g. sunray lamp, solarium), during treatment and for 48 hours following treatment discontinuation in order to prevent photosensitisation.
Patients treated with Vitamin K antagonists: Due to possible increase in coagulation tests (PT/INR) and/or bleeding in patients treated with levofloxacin in combination with a vitamin K antagonist (e.g. warfarin), coagulation tests should be monitored when these drugs are given concomitantly.
Psychotic reactions: Psychotic reactions have been reported in patients receiving quinolones, including levofloxacin. In very rare cases these have progressed to suicidal thoughts and self-endangering behaviour- sometimes after only a single dose of levofloxacin. In the event that the patient develops these reactions, levofloxacin should be discontinued and appropriate measures instituted. Caution is recommended if levofloxacin is to be used in psychotic patients or in patients with history of psychiatric disease.
QT interval prolongation: Caution should be taken when using fluoroquinolones, including levofloxacin, in patients with known risk factors for prolongation of the QT interval such as, for example: congenital long QT syndrome; concomitant use of drugs that are known to prolong the QT interval (e.g. Class IA and III anti-arrhythmics, tricyclic antidepressants, macrolides, antipsychotics); uncorrected electrolyte imbalance (e.g. hypokalaemia, hypomagnesaemia); cardiac disease (e.g. heart failure, myocardial infarction, bradycardia).
Elderly patients and women may be more sensitive to QTc-prolonging medications. Therefore, caution should be taken when using fluoroquinolones, including levofloxacin, in these populations.
Exacerbation of myasthenia gravis: Fluoroquinolones have neuromuscular blocking activity and may exacerbate muscle weakness in persons with myasthenia gravis. Post-marketing serious adverse events, including deaths and requirement for ventilatory support, have been associated with fluoroquinolone use in persons with myasthenia gravis. Avoid fluoroquinolones in patients with known history of myasthenia gravis.
Hepatobiliary disorders: Cases of hepatic necrosis up to fatal hepatic failure have been reported with levofloxacin, primarily in patients with severe underlying diseases, e.g. sepsis. Patients should be advised to stop treatment and contact their doctor if signs and symptoms of hepatic disease develop such as anorexia, jaundice, dark urine, pruritus or tender abdomen.
Peripheral neuropathy: Cases of sensory or sensorimotor axonal polyneuropathy affecting small and/or large axons resulting in paresthesias, hypoesthesias, dysesthesias and weakness have been reported in patients receiving fluoroquinolones, including levofloxacin. Symptoms may occur soon after initiation of levofloxacin and may be irreversible. Levofloxacin should be discontinued immediately if the patient experiences symptoms of peripheral neuropathy including pain, burning, tingling, numbness, and/or weakness, or other alterations in sensations including light touch, pain, temperature, position sense and vibratory sensation.
Vision disorders: If vision becomes impaired or any effects on the eyes are experienced, an eye specialist should be consulted immediately.
Superinfection: The use of levofloxacin, especially if prolonged, may result in overgrowth of non-susceptible organisms. If superinfection occurs during therapy, appropriate measures should be taken.
Interference with laboratory tests: In patients treated with levofloxacin, determination of opiates in urine may give false-positive results. It may be necessary to confirm positive opiate screens by more specific method.
Levofloxacin may inhibit the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and, therefore, may give false-negative results in the bacteriological diagnosis of tuberculosis.
Disabling and potentially irreversible serious adverse reactions including tendinitis and tendon rupture, peripheral neuropathy, and central nervous system effects: Fluoroquinolones, including levofloxacin, have been associated with disabling and potentially irreversible serious adverse reactions from different body systems that can occur together in the same patient. Commonly seen adverse reactions include tendinitis, tendon rupture, arthralgia, myalgia, peripheral neuropathy, and central nervous system effects (hallucinations, anxiety, depression, insomnia, severe headaches, and confusion). These reactions can occur within hours to weeks after starting levofloxacin. Patients of any age or without pre-existing risk factors have experienced these adverse reactions.
Discontinue levofloxacin immediately at the first signs or symptoms of any serious adverse reaction. In addition, avoid the use of fluoroquinolones, including levofloxacin, in patients who have experienced any of these serious adverse reactions associated with fluoroquinolones.
Because fluoroquinolones, including levofloxacin, have been associated with serious adverse reactions, reserve levofloxacin for use in patients who have no alternative treatment options for the following indications: Uncomplicated urinary tract infection; Acute bacterial exacerbation of chronic bronchitis; Acute bacterial sinusitis.
Aortic aneurysm and dissection: Epidemiologic studies report an increased risk of aortic aneurysm and dissection after intake of fluoroquinolones, particularly in the older population.
Therefore, fluoroquinolones should only be used after careful benefit-risk assessment and after consideration of other therapeutic options in patients with positive family history of aneurysm disease, or in patients diagnosed with pre-existing aortic aneurysm and/or aortic dissection, or in presence of other risk factors or conditions predisposing for aortic aneurysm and dissection (e.g., Marfan syndrome, vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, Takayasu arteritis, giant cell arteritis, Behcet's disease, hypertension, known atherosclerosis).
In case of sudden abdominal, chest or back pain, patients should be advised to immediately consult a physician in an emergency department.
Effects on ability to drive and use machines: Some undesirable effects (e.g. dizziness/vertigo, drowsiness, visual disturbances) may impair the patient's ability to concentrate and react, and therefore may constitute a risk in situations where these abilities are of special importance (e.g. driving a car or operating machinery).
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