PecFent

PecFent

fentanyl

Manufacturer:

Kyowa Kirin

Distributor:

DCH Auriga - Healthcare
/
Four Star
Full Prescribing Info
Contents
Fentanyl citrate.
Description
PecFent 100 micrograms/spray nasal spray solution: Each mL of solution contains 1,000 micrograms fentanyl (as citrate).
1 spray (100 microlitres) contains 100 micrograms fentanyl (as citrate).
Each bottle contains 1.55 mL (1,550 micrograms fentanyl).
PecFent 400 micrograms/spray nasal spray solution: Each mL of solution contains 4,000 micrograms fentanyl (as citrate).
1 spray (100 microlitres) contains 400 micrograms fentanyl (as citrate).
Each bottle contains 1.55 mL (6,200 micrograms fentanyl).
Excipients with known effect: Each spray contains 0.02 mg propyl parahydroxybenzoate (E216).
Excipients/Inactive Ingredients: Pectin (E440), Mannitol (E421), Phenylethyl alcohol, Propyl parahydroxybenzoate (E216), Sucrose, Hydrochloric acid (0.36%) or sodium hydroxide (for pH adjustment), Purified water.
Action
Pharmacotherapeutic group: Analgesic; opioids; phenylpiperidine derivatives. ATC code: N02AB03.
Pharmacology: Pharmacodynamics: Mechanism of action: Fentanyl is an opioid analgesic, interacting predominantly with the opioid μ-receptor. Its primary therapeutic actions are analgesia and sedation. Secondary pharmacological effects are respiratory depression, bradycardia, hypothermia, constipation, miosis, physical dependence and euphoria.
Pharmacodynamic effects: A double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled crossover study has been conducted in which 114 patients who experienced on average 1 to 4 episodes of break through pain (BTP) per day while taking maintenance opioid therapy were entered into an initial open-label titration phase in order to identify an effective dose of PecFent (Study CP043). The patients entering the double-blind phase treated up to 10 episodes of BTP with either PecFent (7 episodes) or placebo (3 episodes) in a random order.
Of the patients entering the titration phase, only 7 (6.1%) were unable to be titrated to an effective dose due to lack of efficacy and 6 (5.3%) withdrew due to adverse events.
The primary endpoint was the comparison between the summed pain intensity difference at 30 minutes after dosing (SPID30), which has 6.57 in the PecFent-treated episodes compared to 4.45 for placebo (p<0.0001). The SPID for PecFent-treated episodes was also significantly different to placebo at 10, 15, 45 and 60 minutes after administration.
The mean pain intensity scores (73 patients) for all PecFent-treated episodes (459 episodes) compared to those treated with placebo (200 episodes) were significantly lower at 5, 10, 15, 30, 45 and 60 minutes following administration (see Figure 1).

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The superior efficacy of PecFent over placebo was supported by data from secondary endpoints including the number of BTP episodes with clinically meaningful pain relief, defined as a reduction in pain intensity score of at least 2 (see Figure 2).

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In a double-blind, randomized comparator-controlled study (Study 044) of similar design to Study 043 conducted in opioid-tolerant patients with breakthrough cancer pain on stable doses of regularly scheduled opioids, PecFent was shown to be superior to immediate-release morphine sulfate (IRMS). Superiority was demonstrated by the primary endpoint, Pain Intensity Difference within 15 minutes, which was 3.02 in patients treated with PecFent compared to 2.69 in patients treated with IRMS (p=0.0396).
In a long-term, open-label, safety study (Study 045), 355 patients entered the 16-week treatment phase, during which 42,227 episodes of breakthrough cancer pain (BTP) were treated with PecFent. One hundred of these patients continued treatment for up to 26 months in an extension phase. Of the 355 patients treated in the open-label treatment phase, 90% required no increase in dose.
In the randomised, placebo-controlled study (CP043) 9.4% of 459 PecFent-treated BTP episodes in 73 patients required use of any further (rescue) medicinal products within 60 minutes of dosing. During the longer-term, open-label study (CP045) this was 6.0% of 42,227 episodes in 355 patients treated with PecFent during up to 159 days of treatment.
Pharmacokinetics: General introduction: Fentanyl is highly lipophilic and can be absorbed very rapidly through the nasal mucosa and more slowly by the gastrointestinal route. It is subject to first pass hepatic and intestinal metabolism and the metabolites do not contribute to fentanyl's therapeutic effects.
PecFent utilises the PecSys nasal drug delivery system to modulate the delivery and absorption of fentanyl. The PecSys system allows the product to be sprayed into the front area of the nasal cavity as a fine mist of droplets, which gel on contact with the calcium ions present in the nasal mucosa. Fentanyl diffuses from the gel and is absorbed through the nasal mucosa; this gel-modulated absorption of fentanyl restrains the peak in plasma concentration (Cmax) whilst allowing the attainment of an early time to that peak (Tmax).
Absorption: In a pharmacokinetic study comparing PecFent (100, 200, 400 and 800 micrograms) with oral transmucosal fentanyl citrate (OTFC, 200 micrograms), fentanyl was shown to be rapidly absorbed following single dose intranasal administration of PecFent, with the median Tmax ranging from 15 to 21 minutes (Tmax for OTFC was approximately 90 minutes). The variability of the pharmacokinetics of fentanyl was considerable following treatment with both PecFent and OTFC. Relative bioavailability of fentanyl from the PecFent treatment compared to the 200 microgram OTFC was approximately 120%.
The main pharmacokinetic parameters are shown in the following table. (See Table 1.)

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The curves for each dose level are similar in shape with increasing dose levels producing increasing plasma fentanyl levels. Dose-proportionality was demonstrated for Cmax and area under the curve (AUC) in the dose range 100 micrograms to 800 micrograms (see Figure 3). If switching to PecFent from another fentanyl product the BTP, independent dose titration with PecFent is required as the bioavailability between products differs significantly. (See Figure 3.)

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A pharmacokinetic study was conducted to evaluate the absorption and tolerability of a single dose of PecFent in patients with pollen-induced seasonal allergic rhinitis, comparing the un-challenged, acutely challenged (rhinitic) and acutely challenged and then treated with oxymetazoline, states.
There was no clinically significant effect of acute rhinitis on Cmax, Tmax or overall exposure to fentanyl, comparing the unchallenged with the acutely challenged states. Following treatment of the acute rhinitic state with oxymetazoline, there were reductions in Cmax and exposure, and increases in Tmax that were statistically, and possibly clinically significant.
Distribution: Fentanyl is highly lipophilic and is well distributed beyond the vascular system, with a large apparent volume of distribution. Animal data have shown that, following absorption, fentanyl is rapidly distributed to the brain, heart, lungs, kidneys and spleen followed by a slower redistribution to muscles and fat.
The plasma protein binding of fentanyl is 80-85%. The main binding protein is alpha-1-acid glycoprotein, but both albumin and lipoproteins contribute to some extent. The free fraction of fentanyl increases with acidosis.
Biotransformation: The metabolic pathways following nasal administration of PecFent have not been characterised in clinical studies. Fentanyl is metabolised in the liver to norfentanyl by cytochrome CYP3A4 isoform. Norfentanyl is not pharmacologically active in animal studies. It is more than 90% eliminated by biotransformation to N-dealkylated and hydroxylated inactive metabolites.
Elimination: Disposition of fentanyl following intranasal administration of PecFent has not been characterised in a mass balance study. Less than 7% of an administered dose of fentanyl is excreted unchanged in the urine and only about 1% is excreted unchanged in the faeces. The metabolites are mainly excreted in the urine, while faecal excretion is less important.
The total plasma clearance of fentanyl following intravenous administration is approximately 42 L/h.
Linearity/non-linearity: Dose-proportionality was demonstrated for Cmax and AUC in the dose range 100 micrograms to 800 micrograms.
The effect of renal or hepatic impairment on the pharmacokinetics of PecFent has not been studied.
Toxicology: Preclinical safety data: Non-clinical data reveal no special hazard for humans based on conventional studies of safety pharmacology, repeated dose toxicity, genotoxicity and carcinogenicity.
Embryo-foetal developmental toxicity studies conducted in rats and rabbits revealed no compound-induced malformations or developmental variations when administered during the period of organogenesis.
In a fertility and early embryonic development study in rats, a male-mediated effect was observed at high doses (300 mcg/kg/day, s.c.) and is consistent with the sedative effects of fentanyl in animal studies.
In studies on pre and postnatal development in rats the survival rate of offspring was significantly reduced at doses causing severe maternal toxicity. Further findings at maternally toxic doses in F1 pups were delayed physical development, sensory functions, reflexes and behaviour. These effects could either be indirect effects due to altered maternal care and/or decreased lactation rate or a direct effect of fentanyl on the pups.
Carcinogenicity studies (26-week dermal alternative bioassay in Tg.AC transgenic mice; two-year subcutaneous carcinogenicity study in rats) with fentanyl did not induce any findings indicative of oncogenic potential. Evaluation of brain slides from the carcinogenicity study in rats revealed brain lesions in animals administered high doses of fentanyl citrate. The relevance of these findings to humans is unknown.
Indications/Uses
PecFent is indicated for the management of breakthrough pain (BTP) in adults who are already receiving maintenance opioid therapy for chronic cancer pain.
Breakthrough pain is a transitory exacerbation of pain that occurs on a background of otherwise controlled persistent pain.
Patients receiving maintenance opioid therapy are those who are taking at least 60 mg of oral morphine daily, at least 25 micrograms of transdermal fentanyl per hour, at least 30 mg of oxycodone daily, at least 8 mg of oral hydromorphone daily or an equianalgesic dose of another opioid for a week or longer.
Dosage/Direction for Use
Treatment should be initiated by and remain under the supervision of a physician experienced in the management of opioid therapy in cancer patients. Physicians should keep in mind the potential for abuse of fentanyl.
Posology: PecFent should be titrated to an "effective" dose that provides adequate analgesia and minimises adverse reactions without causing undue (or intolerable) adverse reactions, for two consecutively treated episodes of BTP. The efficacy of a given dose should be assessed over the ensuing 30 minute period.
Patients should be carefully monitored until an effective dose is reached.
PecFent is available in two strengths: 100 micrograms/spray and 400 micrograms/spray.
One dose of PecFent may include administration of 1 spray (100 microgram or 400 microgram doses) or 2 sprays (200 microgram or 800 microgram doses) of the same strength (either 100 microgram or 400 microgram strength).
Patients should not use more than 4 doses per day. Patients should wait at least 4 hours after a dose before treating another BTP episode with PecFent.
PecFent can deliver 100, 200, 400 and 800 microgram doses as follows: (See Table 2.)

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Initial dose: The initial dose of PecFent to treat episodes of BTP is always 100 micrograms (one spray), even in patients switching from other fentanyl containing products for their BTP.
Patients must wait at least 4 hours before treating another episode of BTP with PecFent.
Method of titration: Patients should be prescribed an initial titration supply of one bottle (8 sprays) of PecFent 100 micrograms/spray.
Patients whose initial dose is 100 micrograms and who need to titrate to a higher dose due to a lack of effect can be instructed to use two 100 microgram sprays (one in each nostril) for their next BTP episode. If this dose is not successful, the patient may be prescribed a bottle of PecFent 400 micrograms/spray and instructed to change to one 400 microgram spray for their next episode of pain. If this dose is not successful, the patient may be instructed to increase to two 400 microgram sprays (one in each nostril).
From treatment initiation, patients should be closely followed and the dose titrated until an effective dose is reached and confirmed for two consecutively treated episodes of BTP.
Titration in patients switching between immediate-release fentanyl containing products: Substantial differences may exist in the pharmacokinetic profile of immediate-release fentanyl medicinal products, which result in clinically important differences in the rate and extent of absorption of fentanyl. Therefore, when switching between fentanyl containing medicinal products indicated for treatment of breakthrough pain, including intranasal formulations, it is essential that patients are again titrated with the new medicinal product, and not switched on a dose-for-dose (microgram-for-microgram) basis.
Maintenance therapy: Once an effective dose has been established during titration, patients should continue to take this dose up to a maximum of 4 doses per day.
Dose readjustment: Generally, the maintenance dose of PecFent should be increased only where the current dose fails to adequately treat the BTP for several consecutive episodes.
A review of the dose of the background opioid therapy may be required if patients consistently present with more than four BTP episodes per 24 hours.
If adverse reactions are intolerable or persistent, the dose should be reduced or treatment with PecFent replaced by another analgesic.
Discontinuation of therapy: Pecfent should be discontinued immediately if the patient no longer experiences breakthrough pain episodes. The treatment for persistent background pain should be kept as prescribed.
If discontinuation of all opioid therapy is required, the patient must be closely followed by the doctor as gradual downward opioid titration therapy is necessary in order to avoid the possibility of abrupt withdrawal effects.
Special populations: Elderly (older than 65 years): In the PecFent clinical trial programme, 104 (26.1%) of patients were over 60 years of age, 67 (16.8%) over 65 years and 15 (13.8%) over 75 years. There was no indication that older patients tended to titrate to lower doses or experience more adverse reactions. Nevertheless, in view of the importance of renal and hepatic function in the metabolism and clearance of fentanyl, additional care should be exercised in the use of PecFent in the elderly. No data on the pharmacokinetics of PecFent in elderly patients are available.
Hepatic or renal impairment: PecFent should be administered with caution to patients with moderate or severe hepatic or renal impairment.
Paediatric population: The safety and efficacy of PecFent in children and adolescents aged below 18 years have not yet been established.
No data are available.
Method of administration: PecFent is for nasal use only.
The bottle should be removed from the child resistant container immediately prior to use and the protective cap removed. The bottle must be primed before first use by holding upright and simply pressing and releasing the finger grips either side of the nozzle until a green bar appears in the counting window (should occur after four sprays).
If the product has not been used for 5 days, it should be re-primed by spraying once. The patient should be advised to write the date of the first use in the space provided on the label of the child resistant container.
To administer PecFent the nozzle is placed a short distance (about 1 cm) into the nostril and pointed slightly towards the bridge of the nose. A spray is then administered by pressing and releasing the finger grips either side of the nozzle.
An audible click will be heard and the number displayed on the counter will advance by one.
Patients must be advised that they may not feel the spray being administered, and that they should, therefore, rely on the audible click and the number on the counter advancing to confirm that a spray has been delivered.
The PecFent spray droplets form a gel in the nose. Patients should be advised not to blow their nose immediately after Pecfent administration.
The protective cap should be replaced after each use and the bottle returned to the child resistant container for safe storage.
Overdosage
The symptoms of fentanyl overdose via the nasal route are expected to be similar in nature to those of intravenous fentanyl and other opioids, and are an extension of its pharmacological actions, with the most serious significant effect being respiratory depression.
Immediate management of opioid overdose includes ensuring a patent airway, physical and verbal stimulation of the patient, assessment of the level of consciousness, ventilatory and circulatory status, and assisted ventilation (ventilatory support) if necessary.
For treatment of overdose (accidental ingestion) in the opioid-naive person, intravenous access should be obtained and naloxone or other opioid antagonists should be employed as clinically indicated. The duration of respiratory depression following overdose may be longer than the effects of the opioid antagonist's action (e.g. the half life of naloxone ranges from 30 to 81 minutes) and repeated administration may be necessary. For details about such use the Summary of Product Characteristics of the individual opioid antagonist should be consulted.
For treatment of overdose in opioid-maintained patients, intravenous access should be obtained. The judicious use of naloxone or another opioid antagonist may be warranted in some instances, but it is associated with the risk of precipitating an acute withdrawal syndrome.
It should be noted that although statistically significant increases in Cmax levels were seen following a second dose of PecFent given either one or two hours after the initial dose, this increase is not considered to be large enough to suggest that clinically concerning accumulation of over-exposure would occur, providing a wide safety margin for the recommended dose interval of four hours.
Although muscle rigidity interfering with respiration has not been seen following the use of PecFent, this is possible with fentanyl and other opioids. If it occurs, it should be managed by the use of assisted ventilation, by an opioid antagonist, and as a final alternative, by a neuromuscular blocking agent.
Contraindications
Hypersensitivity to the active substance or to any of the excipients listed.
Patients without maintenance opioid therapy as there is an increased risk of respiratory depression.
Severe respiratory depression or severe obstructive lung conditions.
Treatment of acute pain other than breakthrough pain.
Special Precautions
Patients and their carers must be instructed that PecFent contains an active substance in an amount that can be fatal to a child.
In order to minimise the risks of opioid-related adverse reactions and to identify the effective dose, it is imperative that patients be monitored closely by health professionals during the titration process.
It is important that the long acting opioid treatment used to treat the patient's persistent pain has been stabilised before PecFent therapy begins.
Respiratory depression: There is a risk of clinically significant respiratory depression associated with the use of fentanyl. Patients with pain who receive chronic opioid therapy develop tolerance to respiratory depression and hence the risk of respiratory depression in these patients is reduced. The use of concomitant central nervous system depressants may increase the risk of respiratory depression.
Chronic pulmonary disease: In patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases, fentanyl may cause more serious adverse reactions. In these patients, opioids may decrease respiratory drive and increase airway resistance.
Increased intracranial pressure: PecFent should only be administered with extreme caution in patients who may be particularly susceptible to the intracranial effects of CO2 retention, such as those with evidence of increased intracranial presssure or impaired consciousness. Opioids may obscure the clinical course of patients with a head injury and should be used only if clinically warranted.
Cardiac disease: Fentanyl may produce bradycardia. PecFent should, therefore, be used with caution in patients with previous or pre-existing bradyarrhythmias.
Impaired hepatic or renal function: In addition, PecFent should be administered with caution to patients with hepatic or renal impairment. The influence of hepatic and renal impairment on the pharmacokinetics of the medicinal product has not been evaluated; however, when administered intravenously the clearance of fentanyl has been shown to be altered in hepatic and renal impairment due to alterations in metabolic clearance and plasma proteins. Therefore, special care should be taken during the titration process in patients with moderate or severe hepatic or renal impairment.
Careful consideration should be given to patients with hypovolaemia and hypotension.
Abuse potential and tolerance: Tolerance and physical and/or psychological dependence may develop upon repeated administration of opioids such as fentanyl. However, iatrogenic addiction following therapeutic use of opioids is rare.
Athletes should be informed that treatment with fentanyl could lead to positive doping tests.
Serotonin Syndrome: Caution is advised when PecFent is coadministered with medicinal products that affect the serotoninergic neurotransmitter systems.
The development of a potentially life-threatening serotonin syndrome may occur with the concomitant use of serotonergic medicinal products such as Selective Serotonin Re-uptake Inhibitors (SSRIs) and Serotonin Norepinephrine Re-uptake Inhibitors (SNRIs), and with medicinal products which impair metabolism of serotonin (including Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors [MAOIs]). This may occur within the recommended dose.
Serotonin syndrome may include mental-status changes (e.g., agitation, hallucinations, coma), autonomic instability (e.g., tachycardia, labile blood pressure, hyperthermia), neuromuscular abnormalities (e.g., hyperreflexia, incoordination, rigidity), and/or gastrointestinal symptoms (e.g., nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea).
If serotonin syndrome is suspected, treatment with PecFent should be discontinued.
Route of administration: PecFent is only intended for nasal use, and must not be administered by any other route. Due to physico-chemical properties of excipients included in the formulation, intravenous or intra-arterial injection must be avoided in particular.
Nasal conditions: If the patient experiences recurrent episodes of epistaxis or nasal discomfort while taking PecFent, an alternative method of administration for treatment of breakthrough pain should be considered.
PecFent excipients: PecFent contains propyl parahydroxybenzoate (E216), Propyl parahydroxybenzoate may cause allergic reactions (possibly delayed) and, exceptionally, bronchospasm (if the medicinal product is not correctly administered).
Effects on ability to drive and use machines: Opioid analgesics may impair the mental and/or physical ability required for driving or operating machinery.
Patients should be advised not to drive or operate machinery if they experience somnolence, dizziness, or visual disturbance or other adverse reactions which can impair their ability to drive or operate machinery.
Use In Pregnancy & Lactation
Pregnancy: There are no adequate data from the use of fentanyl in pregnant women. Studies in animals have shown reproductive toxicity. The potential risk for humans is unknown. PecFent should not be used during pregnancy unless clearly necessary.
Following long-term treatment, fentanyl may cause withdrawal in the new-born infant. It is advised not to use fentanyl during labour and delivery (including caesarean section) because fentanyl passes through the placenta and may cause respiratory depression in the foetus. If PecFent is administered, an antidote for the child should be readily available.
Breastfeeding: Fentanyl passes into breast milk and may cause sedation and respiratory depression in the breast-fed child. Fentanyl should not be used by breastfeeding women and breast-feeding should not be restarted until at least 5 days after the last administration of fentanyl.
Fertility: There are no clinical data on the effects of fentanyl on fertility.
Adverse Reactions
Summary of the safety profile: Typical opioid adverse reactions are to be expected with PecFent. Frequently, these will cease or decrease in intensity with continued use of the medicinal product, as the patient is titrated to the most appropriate dose. However, the most serious adverse reactions are respiratory depression (potentially leading to apnoea or respiratory arrest), circulatory depression, hypotension and shock and all patients should be monitored for these.
The clinical studies of PecFent were designed to evaluate safety and efficacy in treating BTP and all patients were also on background opioid therapies, such as sustained-release morphine or transdermal fentanyl, for their persistent pain. Therefore it is not possible to definitely separate the effects of PecFent alone.
Tabulated list of adverse reactions: The following adverse reactions have been reported with PecFent and/or other fentanyl-containing compounds during clinical studies and post marketing experience (frequencies defined as very common (≥1/10); common (≥1/100 to <1/10); uncommon (≥1/1,000 to <1/100); rare (≥1/10,000 to <1/1,000); very rare (<1/10,000); unknown (cannot be estimated from available data)). (See Table 3.)

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Description of selected adverse reactions: Opioid withdrawal symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea, anxiety, chills, tremor, and sweating have been observed with transmucosal fentanyl.
Reporting of suspected adverse reactions: Reporting suspected adverse reactions after authorisation of the medicinal product is important. It allows continued monitoring of the benefit/risk balance of the medicinal product. Healthcare professionals are asked to report any suspected adverse reactions.
Drug Interactions
Fentanyl is metabolised mainly via the human cytochrome P450 3A4 isoenzyme system (CYP3A4), therefore potential interactions may occur when PecFent is given concurrently with medicinal products that affect CYP3A4 activity.
Coadministration with medicinal products that induce 3A4 activity may reduce the efficacy of PecFent. The concomitant use of PecFent with strong CYP3A4 inhibitors (e.g. ritonavir, ketoconazole, itraconazole, troleandomycin, clarithromycin, and nelfinavir) or moderate CYP3A4 inhibitors (e.g. amprenavir, aprepitant, diltiazem, erythromycin, fluconazole, fosamprenavir, grapefruit juice, and verapamil) may result in increased fentanyl plasma concentrations, potentially causing serious adverse drug reactions including fatal respiratory depression. Patients receiving PecFent concomitantly with moderate or strong CYP3A4 inhibitors should be carefully monitored for an extended period of time. Dose increase should be undertaken with caution.
The concomitant use of other central nervous system depressants, including other opioids, sedatives or hypnotics, general anaesthetics, phenothiazines, tranquillisers, skeletal muscle relaxants, sedating antihistamines and alcohol may produce additive depressant effects.
Serotoninergic medicinal products: Coadministration of fentanyl with a serotoninergic medicinal product, such as a Selective Serotonin Re-uptake Inhibitor (SSRI) or a Serotonin Norepinephrine Re-uptake Inhibitor (SNRI) or a Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitor (MAOI), may increase the risk of serotonin syndrome, a potentially life threatening condition.
PecFent is not recommended for use in patients who have received monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors within the previous 14 days because severe and unpredictable potentiation by MAO inhibitors has been reported with opioid analgesics.
The concomitant use of partial opioid agonists/antagonists (e.g. buprenorphine, nalbuphine, pentazocine) is not recommended. They have high affinity to opioid receptors with relatively low intrinsic activity and, therefore, partially antagonise the analgesic effect of fentanyl and may induce withdrawal symptoms in opioid dependent patients.
Concomitant use of nasally administered oxymetazoline has been shown to decrease the absorption of PecFent. The concomitant use of nasally administered vasoconstrictive decongestants during titration is, therefore, not recommended as this may lead to patients titrating to a dose that is higher than required. PecFent maintenance treatment may also be less effective in patients with rhinitis when administered concomitantly with a nasal vasoconstrictive decongestant. If this occurs, patients should be advised to discontinue their decongestant.
Concomitant use of PecFent and other medicinal products (other than oxymetazoline) administered via the nose has not been evaluated in the clinical trials. Other nasally administered treatments should be avoided within 15 minutes of dosing with PecFent.
Caution For Usage
Special precautions for disposal: Partially used PecFent bottles may contain enough medicine to be harmful or life-threatening to a child. even if there is little or no medicine left in the bottle, PecFent must be disposed of properly, according to the following steps: Patients and caregivers must be instructed to properly dispose of all unused, partially used and used PecFent bottles. The patient should be instructed how to do this correctly.
If there are any unwanted therapeutic sprays remaining in the bottle, the patient should be instructed to expel these by aiming the spray away from themselves (and any other people) until the red number "8" appears in the counting window and there are no more full therapeutic sprays obtainable from the bottle.
After the counter has advanced to "8", the patient should continue to push down on the finger grips (there will be some increased resistance) a total of four times in order to expel any residual medicine from the bottle.
After the 8 therapeutic sprays have been emitted, the patient will not era a click and the counter will not advance beyond "8"; further sprays emitted will not be full sprays and should not be used therapeutically.
As soon a PecFent is no longer needed, patients and members of their household must be advised to systemically dispose of any bottles remaining from a prescription as soon as possible by returning them to their child-resistant container and discarding them, according to local requirements or by returning them to the pharmacy.
Incompatibilities: Not applicable.
Storage
Do not store above 25°C.
Do not freeze.
Keep the bottle in the child resistant container in order to protect from light.
Store the bottle in the child resistant container at all times, even when finished.
Shelf life: 3 years.
After first use: 60 days.
Patient Counseling Information
How to use PecFent: Always use this medicine exactly as your doctor or pharmacist has told you.
Check with your doctor or pharmacist if you are not sure.
PecFent comes in two different strengths: A 100 microgram per spray bottle and a 400 microgram per spray bottle. Make sure that you use the strength that your doctor has prescribed for you.
How much to use: A dose to treat a breakthrough pain episode might be either 1 spray or 2 sprays (one in each nostril). Your doctor will tell you how many sprays (1 or 2) you should use to treat your breakthrough pain episode.
Do not use more than the dose your doctor prescribes for any single breakthrough pain episode.
Do not use PecFent more than 4 times daily.
Wait at least 4 hours to take the next dose of PecFent.
Starting dose: The starting dose is 100 micrograms.
This is a single spray into one nostril from the 100 microgram per spray bottle.
See 'Using the PecFent bottle' for instructions on how to use a dose.
Finding the right dose: Your doctor will then help you find the right dose to relieve your breakthrough pain. It is very important to follow your doctor's instructions.
Using the PecFent bottle: Instructions on how to open and close the child resistant container: A) Insert fingers into rear cavities and squeeze while pushing down top button. B) Open. C) Close.
Tell your doctor about your pain and how PecFent is working. Your doctor will decide if your PecFent dose needs to be changed.
Do not change the dose yourself.
Once you have found the right dose: Tell your doctor if your dose of PecFent does not relieve your breakthrough pain. Your doctor will decide if your dose needs to be changed. Do not change the dose of PecFent or your other pain medicines yourself.
Tell your doctor straight away if you have more than 4 episodes of breakthrough pain a day. Your doctor may change the medicine for your constant pain. Once your constant pain is controlled, your doctor may then change your dose of PecFent.
If you are not sure about the right dose or how much PecFent to use, ask your doctor.
Preparing the PecFent bottle for use: Before you use a new bottle of PecFent you need to prepare it for use. This is called 'priming'.
To prime the bottle, follow the instructions below: 1. A new bottle of PecFent will show two red lines in the counting window in the white plastic top on the bottle.
2. Take off the clear plastic protective cap from the nozzle.
3. Aim the nasal spray away from you (and any other people).
4. Hold the PecFent nasal spray upright with your thumb on the bottom of the bottle, and your first and middle fingers on the finger grips each side of the nozzle.
5. Firmly press down on the finger grips until a 'click' is heard and then let go of the grips. You will hear a second 'click' and there should now be a single large red bar in the counting window.
6. Repeat step 5 three times. As you repeat step 5, the red bar will become smaller and smaller until you see a green bar in the counting window. The green bar means the PecFent nasal spray is ready to use.
7. Wipe the nozzle with a tissue and flush the tissue down the toilet.
8. If you are not going to use your medicine straight away, put the protective cap back on. Then put the PecFent bottle in the child-resistant storage container. If PecFent has not been used for 5 days, re-prime by spraying once.
Using PecFent: PecFent is only to be used by spraying into your nostril: 1. Check that there is a green bar or a number showing in the counting window: this confirms that the PecFent bottle has been primed (see 'Preparing the PecFent bottle for use' above).
2. Blow your nose if you feel you need to.
3. Sit down with your head upright.
4. Take off the protective cap from the nozzle.
5. Hold the PecFent bottle with your thumb on the bottom of the bottle and your first and middle fingers on the finger grips.
6. Put the nozzle a short distance (about 1 cm) into your nostril. Point it inwards towards the wall of your nose. This will tilt the bottle slightly.
7. Close the other nostril with a finger from your other hand.
8. Firmly press down on the finger grips so that PecFent sprays into your nostril. When you hear a click let go of the grips. Note: You may not feel anything happen in your nose at all - do not trust this to mean the spray did not operate - rely on the click and number counter.
9. Breathe in gently through your nose and out through your mouth.
10. The number counter will move forward after each use and show how many sprays have been used.
11. If your doctor has prescribed a second spray, repeat steps 5 to 9, using the other nostril.
Do not use more than the dose that your doctor prescribes to treat any single pain episode.
12. Put the bottle back in the child-resistant container after each use. Keep out of the sight and reach of children.
13. Stay sitting for at least 1 minute after using the nasal spray.
MIMS Class
ATC Classification
N02AB03 - fentanyl ; Belongs to the class of phenylpiperidine derivative opioids. Used to relieve pain.
Presentation/Packing
Nasal spray (clear to practically clear colourless aqueous solution) 100 mcg/spray x 1.55 mL x 1's. 400 mcg/spray x 1.55 mL x 1's.
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