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Rinvoq

Rinvoq Adverse Reactions

Manufacturer:

AbbVie

Distributor:

The Glory Medicina
/
DKSH
Full Prescribing Info
Adverse Reactions
Summary of the safety profile: The most commonly reported adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are upper respiratory tract infections (13.5%), nausea (3.5%), blood creatine phosphokinase (CPK) increased (2.5%) and cough (2.2%). The most common serious adverse reactions were serious infections (see Precautions).
Tabulated list of adverse reactions: The following list of adverse reactions is based on experience from registrational clinical studies.
The frequency of adverse reactions listed as follows is defined using the following convention: very common (≥ 1/10); common (≥ 1/100 to < 1/10); uncommon (≥ 1/1,000 to < 1/100). Within each frequency grouping, undesirable effects are presented in order of decreasing seriousness. (See Table 6.)

Click on icon to see table/diagram/image

Description of selected adverse reactions: Infections: In placebo-controlled clinical studies with background DMARDs, the frequency of infection over 12/14 weeks in the upadacitinib 15 mg group was 27.4% compared to 20.9% in the placebo group. In methotrexate (MTX)-controlled studies, the frequency of infection over 12/14 weeks in the upadacitinib 15 mg monotherapy group was 19.5% compared to 24.0% in the MTX group. The overall long-term rate of infections for the upadacitinib 15 mg group across all five Phase 3 clinical studies (2,630 patients) was 93.7 events per 100 patient-years.
In placebo-controlled clinical studies with background DMARDs, the frequency of serious infection over 12/14 weeks in the upadacitinib 15 mg group was 1.2% compared to 0.6% in the placebo group. In MTX-controlled studies, the frequency of serious infection over 12/14 weeks in the upadacitinib 15 mg monotherapy group was 0.6% compared to 0.4% in the MTX group. The overall long-term rate of serious infections for the upadacitinib 15 mg group across all five Phase 3 clinical studies was 3.8 events per 100 patient-years. The most common serious infection was pneumonia. The rate of serious infections remained stable with long-term exposure.
There was a higher rate of serious infections in patients ≥ 75 years of age, although data are limited.
The frequencies of infection ADRs for upadacitinib compared to placebo were: URTI (13.5% vs 9.5%), pneumonia (0.5% vs 0.3%), herpes zoster (0.7% vs 0.2%), herpes simplex (0.8% v 0.5%), and oral candidiasis (0.4% vs. <0.1%). Most of the herpes zoster events involved a single dermatome and were non-serious.
Opportunistic infections (excluding tuberculosis): In placebo-controlled clinical studies with background DMARDs, the frequency of opportunistic infections over 12/14 weeks in the upadacitinib 15 mg group was 0.5% compared to 0.3% in the placebo group. In MTX-controlled studies, there were no cases of opportunistic infection over 12/14 weeks in the upadacitinib 15 mg monotherapy group and 0.2% in the MTX group. The overall long-term rate of opportunistic infections for the upadacitinib 15 mg group across all five Phase 3 clinical studies was 0.6 events per 100 patient-years.
Hepatic transaminase elevations: In placebo-controlled studies with background DMARDs, for up to 12/14 weeks, alanine transaminase (ALT) and aspartate transaminase (AST) elevations ≥ 3 x upper limit of normal (ULN) in at least one measurement were observed in 2.1% and 1.5% of patients treated with upadacitinib 15 mg, compared to 1.5% and 0.7%, respectively, of patients treated with placebo. Most cases of hepatic transaminase elevations were asymptomatic and transient.
In MTX-controlled studies, for up to 12/14 weeks, ALT and AST elevations ≥ 3 x ULN in at least one measurement were observed in 0.8% and 0.4% of patients treated with upadacitinib 15 mg, compared to 1.9% and 0.9%, respectively, of patients treated with MTX.
The pattern and incidence of elevation in ALT/AST remained stable over time including in long term extension studies.
Lipid elevations: Upadacitinib 15 mg treatment was associated with dose-dependent increases in lipid parameters including total cholesterol, triglycerides, LDL cholesterol and HDL cholesterol. There was no change in the LDL/HDL ratio. Elevations were observed at 2 to 4 weeks of treatment and remained stable with longer-term treatment. Among patients in the controlled studies with baseline values below the specified limits, the following frequencies of patients were observed to shift to above the specified limits on at least one occasion during 12/14 weeks (including patients who had an isolated elevated value): Total cholesterol ≥ 5.17 mmol/L (200 mg/dL): 62% vs. 31%, in the upadacitinib 15 mg and placebo groups, respectively.
LDL cholesterol ≥ 3.36 mmol/L (130 mg/dL): 42% vs. 19%, in the upadacitinib 15 mg and placebo groups, respectively.
HDL cholesterol ≥ 1.03 mmol/L (40 mg/dL): 89% vs. 61%, in the upadacitinib 15 mg and placebo groups, respectively.
Triglycerides ≥ 2.26 mmol/L (200 mg/dL): 25% vs. 15%, in the upadacitinib 15 mg and placebo groups, respectively.
Creatine phosphokinase: In placebo-controlled studies with background DMARDs, for up to 12/14 weeks, increases in CPK values were observed. CPK elevations > 5 x upper limit of normal (ULN) were reported in 1.0% and 0.3% of patients over 12/14 weeks in the upadacitinib 15 mg and placebo groups, respectively. Most elevations > 5 x ULN were transient and did not require treatment discontinuation. Mean CPK values increased by 4 weeks with a mean increase of 60 U/L at 12 weeks and then remained stable at an increased value thereafter including with extended therapy.
Neutropaenia: In placebo-controlled studies with background DMARDs, for up to 12/14 weeks, decreases in neutrophil counts below 1,000 cells/mm3 in at least one measurement occurred in 1.1% and <0.1% of patients in the upadacitinib 15 mg and placebo groups, respectively. In clinical studies, treatment was interrupted in response to ANC < 1,000 cells/mm3 (see Dosage & Administration). Mean neutrophil counts decreased over 4 to 8 weeks. The decreases in neutrophil counts remained stable at a lower value than baseline over time including with extended therapy.
Reporting of suspected adverse reactions: Reporting suspected adverse reactions after authorisation of the medicinal product is important. It allows continued monitoring of the benefit/risk balance of the medicinal product. Healthcare professionals are asked to report any suspected adverse reactions according to the local requirement.
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