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Rinvoq

Rinvoq Mechanism of Action

Manufacturer:

AbbVie

Distributor:

The Glory Medicina
/
DKSH
Full Prescribing Info
Action
Pharmacotherapeutic group: Immunosuppressants, selective immunosuppressants. ATC code: L04AA44.
Pharmacology: Pharmacodynamics: Mechanism of action: Janus Kinases (JAKs) are intracellular enzymes that transmit cytokine or growth factor signals involved in a broad range of cellular processes including inflammatory responses, hematopoiesis and immune surveillance. The JAK family of enzymes contains four members, JAK1, JAK2, JAK3 and TYK2 which work in pairs to phosphorylate and activate signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs). This phosphorylation, in turn, modulates gene expression and cellular function. JAK1 is important in inflammatory cytokine signals while JAK2 is important for red blood cell maturation and JAK3 signals play a role in immune surveillance and lymphocyte function.
Upadacitinib is a selective and reversible JAK inhibitor. In human cellular assays, upadacitinib preferentially inhibits signalling by JAK1 or JAK1/3 with functional selectivity over cytokine receptors that signal via pairs of JAK2.
Pharmacodynamic effects: Inhibition of IL-6 induced STAT3 and IL-7 induced STAT5 phosphorylation: In healthy volunteers, the administration of upadacitinib (immediate release formulation) resulted in a dose- and concentration-dependent inhibition of IL-6 (JAK1/JAK2) - induced STAT3 and IL-7 (JAK1/JAK3)-induced STAT5 phosphorylation in whole blood. The maximal inhibition was observed 1 hour after dosing which returned to near baseline by the end of dosing interval.
Lymphocytes: Treatment with upadacitinib was associated with a small, transient increase in mean ALC from baseline up to Week 36 which gradually returned to at or near baseline levels with continued treatment.
hsCRP: Treatment with upadacitinib was associated with decreases from baseline in mean hsCRP levels as early as Week 1 which were maintained with continued treatment.
Clinical efficacy and safety: The efficacy and safety of upadacitinib 15 mg once daily was assessed in five Phase 3 randomised, double-blind, multicentre studies in patients with moderately to severely active rheumatoid arthritis and fulfilling the ACR/EULAR 2010 classification criteria (see Table 1). Patients 18 years of age and older were eligible to participate. The presence of at least 6 tender and 6 swollen joints and evidence of systemic inflammation based on elevation of hsCRP was required at baseline. All studies included long-term extensions for up to 5 years.
The primary analysis for each of these studies included all randomised subjects who received at least 1 dose of study drug, and non-responder imputation was used for categorical endpoints.
Across the Phase 3 studies, the efficacy seen with upadacitinib 15 mg QD was generally similar to that observed with upadacitinib 30 mg QD. (See Table 1.)

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Clinical Response: Remission and low disease activity: In the studies, a significantly higher proportion of patients treated with upadacitinib 15 mg achieved low disease activity (DAS28-CRP ≤3.2) and clinical remission (DAS28-CRP <2.6) compared to placebo, MTX or adalimumab (Table 2). Compared to adalimumab, significantly higher rates of low disease activity were achieved at week 12 in SELECT-COMPARE. Overall, both low disease activity and clinical remission rates were consistent across patient populations, with or without MTX.
ACR Response: In all studies, more patients treated with upadacitinib 15 mg achieved ACR20, ACR50, and ACR70 responses at 12 weeks compared to placebo, MTX, or adalimumab (Table 2). Time to onset of efficacy was rapid across measures with greater responses seen as early as week 1 for ACR20. Durable response rates were observed (with or without MTX), with ACR20/50/70 responses maintained for at least 1 year.
Treatment with upadacitinib 15 mg, alone or in combination with csDMARDs, resulted in improvements in individual ACR components, including tender and swollen joint counts, patient and physician global assessments, HAQ-DI, pain assessment and hsCRP. (See Table 2.)

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Radiographic response: Inhibition of progression of structural joint damage was assessed using the modified Total Sharp Score (mTSS) and its components, the erosion score and joint space narrowing score, at weeks 24/26 and week 48 in SELECT-EARLY and SELECT-COMPARE.
Treatment with upadacitinib 15 mg resulted in significantly greater inhibition of the progression of structural joint damage compared to placebo in combination with MTX in SELECT-COMPARE and as monotherapy compared to MTX in SELECT-EARLY (Table 3). Analyses of erosion and joint space narrowing scores were consistent with the overall scores. The proportion of patients with no radiographic progression (mTSS change ≤ 0) was significantly higher with upadacitinib 15 mg in both studies. (See Table 3.)

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Physical function response and health-related outcomes: Treatment with upadacitinib 15 mg, alone or in combination with csDMARDs, resulted in a significantly greater improvement in physical function compared to all comparators as measured by HAQ-DI (see Table 4).

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In the studies SELECT-MONOTHERAPY, SELECT-NEXT, and SELECT-COMPARE, treatment with upadacitinib 15 mg resulted in a significantly greater improvement in the mean duration of morning joint stiffness compared to placebo or MTX.
In the clinical studies, upadacitinib treated patients reported significant improvements in patient-reported quality of life, as measured by the Short Form (36) Health Survey (SF-36) Physical Component Score compared to placebo and MTX. Moreover, upadacitinib treated patients reported significant improvements in fatigue, as measured by the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Fatigue score (FACIT-F) compared to placebo.
Pharmacokinetics: Upadacitinib plasma exposures are proportional to dose over the therapeutic dose range. Steady-state plasma concentrations are achieved within 4 days with minimal accumulation after multiple once-daily administrations.
Absorption: Following oral administration of upadacitinib prolonged-release formulation, upadacitinib is absorbed with a median Tmax of 2 to 4 hours. Coadministration of upadacitinib with a high-fat meal had no clinically relevant effect on upadacitinib exposures (increased AUC by 29% and Cmax by 39%). In clinical trials, upadacitinib was administered without regard to meals (see Dosage & Administration). In vitro, upadacitinib is a substrate for the efflux transporters P-gp and BCRP.
Distribution: Upadacitinib is 52% bound to plasma proteins. Upadacitinib partitions similarly between plasma and blood cellular components, as indicated by the blood to plasma ratio of 1.0.
Metabolism: Upadacitinib metabolism is mediated by CYP3A4 with a potential minor contribution from CYP2D6. The pharmacologic activity of upadacitinib is attributed to the parent molecule. In a human radiolabeled study, unchanged upadacitinib accounted for 79% of the total radioactivity in plasma while the main metabolite (product of monooxidation followed by glucuronidation) accounted for 13% of the total plasma radioactivity. No active metabolites have been identified for upadacitinib.
Elimination: Following single dose administration of [14C]-upadacitinib immediate-release solution, upadacitinib was eliminated predominantly as the unchanged parent substance in urine (24%) and faeces (38%). Approximately 34% of upadacitinib dose was excreted as metabolites. Upadacitinib mean terminal elimination half-life ranged from 9 to 14 hours.
Renal impairment: Renal impairment has no clinically relevant effect on upadacitinib exposure. Upadacitinib AUC was 18%, 33%, and 44% higher in subjects with mild (estimated glomerular filtration rate 60 to 89 mL/min/1.73 m2), moderate (estimated glomerular filtration rate 30 to 59 mL/min/1.73 m2), and severe (estimated glomerular filtration rate 15 to 29 mL/min/1.73 m2) renal impairment, respectively, compared to subjects with normal renal function. Upadacitinib Cmax was similar in subjects with normal and impaired renal function.
Hepatic impairment: Mild (Child-Pugh A) and moderate (Child-Pugh B) hepatic impairment has no clinically relevant effect on upadacitinib exposure. Upadacitinib AUC was 28% and 24% higher in subjects with mild and moderate hepatic impairment, respectively, compared to subjects with normal liver function. Upadacitinib Cmax was unchanged in subjects with mild hepatic impairment and 43% higher in subjects with moderate hepatic impairment compared to subjects with normal liver function. Upadacitinib was not studied in patients with severe (Child-Pugh C) hepatic impairment.
Paediatric population: The pharmacokinetics of upadacitinib have not yet been evaluated in a paediatric population (see Dosage & Administration).
Intrinsic factors: Age, sex, body weight, race, and ethnicity did not have a clinically meaningful effect on upadacitinib exposure.
Toxicology: Preclinical safety data: Non-clinical data reveal no special hazard for humans based on conventional studies of safety pharmacology.
Upadacitinib, at exposures (based on AUC) approximately 4 and 10 times the clinical dose of 15 mg in male and female Sprague-Dawley rats, respectively, was not carcinogenic in a 2-year carcinogenicity study in Sprague-Dawley rats. Upadacitinib was not carcinogenic in a 26-week carcinogenicity study in CByB6F1-Tg (HRAS)2Jic transgenic mice.
Upadacitinib was not mutagenic or genotoxic based on the results of in vitro and in vivo tests for gene mutations and chromosomal aberrations.
Upadacitinib had no effect on fertility in male or female rats at doses up to 50 mg/kg/day in males and 75 mg/kg/day in females in a fertility and early embryonic development study. Dose related increases in foetal resorptions associated with post-implantation losses at 25 and 75 mg/kg/day in this study in rats were attributed to the developmental/teratogenic effects of upadacitinib. Upadacitinib was teratogenic in both rats and rabbits. In a pre-/postnatal development study in rats, there were no maternal effects, no effects on parturition, lactation or maternal behaviour and no effects on their offspring.
Following administration of upadacitinib to lactating rats, the concentrations of upadacitinib in milk over time generally paralleled those in plasma, with approximately 30-fold higher exposure in milk relative to maternal plasma. Approximately 97% of drug-related material in milk was parent drug.
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