Stelara

Stelara Mechanism of Action

ustekinumab

Manufacturer:

Janssen

Distributor:

DCH Auriga - Healthcare
/
Four Star
Full Prescribing Info
Action
Pharmacotherapeutic group: Immunosuppressants, interleukin inhibitors. ATC code: L04AC05.
Pharmacology: Pharmacodynamics: Mechanism of action: Ustekinumab is a fully human IgG1κ monoclonal antibody that binds with specificity to the shared p40 protein subunit of human cytokines interleukin (IL)-12 and IL-23. Ustekinumab inhibits the bioactivity of human IL-12 and IL-23 by preventing p40 from binding to the IL-12Rβ1 receptor protein expressed on the surface of immune cells. Ustekinumab cannot bind to IL-12 or IL-23 that is already bound to IL-12Rβ1 cell surface receptors. Thus, ustekinumab is not likely to contribute to complement- or antibody-mediated cytotoxicity of cells with IL-12 and/or IL-23 receptors. IL-12 and IL-23 are heterodimeric cytokines secreted by activated antigen presenting cells, such as macrophages and dendritic cells, and both cytokines participate in immune functions; IL-12 stimulates natural killer (NK) cells and drives the differentiation of CD4+ T cells toward the T helper 1 (Th1) phenotype, IL-23 induces the T helper 17 (Th17) pathway. However, abnormal regulation of IL 12 and IL 23 has been associated with immune mediated diseases, such as psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis and Crohn's disease.
By binding the shared p40 subunit of IL-12 and IL-23, ustekinumab may exert its clinical effects in both psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis and Crohn's disease through interruption of the Th1 and Th17 cytokine pathways, which are central to the pathology of these diseases.
In patients with Crohn's disease, treatment with ustekinumab resulted in a decrease in inflammatory markers including C-Reactive Protein (CRP) and fecal calprotectin during the induction phase, which were then maintained throughout the maintenance phase.
Immunisation: During the long term extension of Psoriasis Study 2 (PHOENIX 2), adult patients treated with STELARA for at least 3.5 years mounted similar antibody responses to both pneumococcal polysaccharide and tetanus vaccines as a non-systemically treated psoriasis control group. Similar proportions of adult patients developed protective levels of anti-pneumococcal and anti-tetanus antibodies and antibody titers were similar among STELARA treated and control patients.
Clinical efficacy: Soln for inj in pre-filled syringe: Plaque psoriasis (Adults): The safety and efficacy of ustekinumab was assessed in 1,996 patients in two randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies in patients with moderate to severe plaque psoriasis and who were candidates for phototherapy or systemic therapy. In addition, a randomised, blinded assessor, active-controlled study compared ustekinumab and etanercept in patients with moderate to severe plaque psoriasis who had had an inadequate response to, intolerance to, or contraindication to ciclosporin, MTX, or PUVA.
Psoriasis Study 1 (PHOENIX 1) evaluated 766 patients. 53% of these patients were either non-responsive, intolerant, or had a contraindication to other systemic therapy. Patients randomised to ustekinumab received 45 mg or 90 mg doses at Weeks 0 and 4 and followed by the same dose every 12 weeks. Patients randomised to receive placebo at Weeks 0 and 4 crossed over to receive ustekinumab (either 45 mg or 90 mg) at Weeks 12 and 16 followed by dosing every 12 weeks. Patients originally randomised to ustekinumab who achieved Psoriasis Area and Severity Index 75 response (PASI improvement of at least 75% relative to baseline) at both Weeks 28 and 40 were re-randomised to receive ustekinumab every 12 weeks or to placebo (i.e., withdrawal of therapy). Patients who were re-randomised to placebo at week 40 reinitiated ustekinumab at their original dosing regimen when they experienced at least a 50% loss of their PASI improvement obtained at week 40. All patients were followed for up to 76 weeks following first administration of study treatment.
Psoriasis Study 2 (PHOENIX 2) evaluated 1,230 patients. 61% of these patients were either non-responsive, intolerant, or had a contraindication to other systemic therapy. Patients randomised to ustekinumab received 45 mg or 90 mg doses at Weeks 0 and 4 followed by an additional dose at 16 weeks. Patients randomised to receive placebo at Weeks 0 and 4 crossed over to receive ustekinumab (either 45 mg or 90 mg) at Weeks 12 and 16. All patients were followed for up to 52 weeks following first administration of study treatment.
Psoriasis Study 3 (ACCEPT) evaluated 903 patients with moderate to severe psoriasis who inadequately responded to, were intolerant to, or had a contraindication to other systemic therapy and compared the efficacy of ustekinumab to etanercept and evaluated the safety of ustekinumab and etanercept. During the 12-week active-controlled portion of the study, patients were randomised to receive etanercept (50 mg twice a week), ustekinumab 45 mg at Weeks 0 and 4, or ustekinumab 90 mg at Weeks 0 and 4.
Baseline disease characteristics were generally consistent across all treatment groups in Psoriasis Studies 1 and 2 with a median baseline PASI score from 17 to 18, median baseline Body Surface Area (BSA) ≥ 20, and median Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) range from 10 to 12. Approximately one third (Psoriasis Study 1) and one quarter (Psoriasis Study 2) of subjects had Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA). Similar disease severity was also seen in Psoriasis Study 3.
The primary endpoint in these studies was the proportion of patients who achieved PASI 75 response from baseline at week 12 (see Tables 1 and 2).

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In Psoriasis Study 1 maintenance of PASI 75 was significantly superior with continuous treatment compared with treatment withdrawal (p < 0.001). Similar results were seen with each dose of ustekinumab. At 1 year (week 52), 89% of patients re-randomised to maintenance treatment were PASI 75 responders compared with 63% of patients re-randomised to placebo (treatment withdrawal) (p < 0.001). At 18 months (week 76), 84% of patients re-randomised to maintenance treatment were PASI 75 responders compared with 19% of patients re-randomised to placebo (treatment withdrawal). At 3 years (week 148), 82% of patients re-randomised to maintenance treatment were PASI 75 responders. At 5 years (week 244), 80% of patients re-randomised to maintenance treatment were PASI 75 responders.
In patients re-randomised to placebo, and who reinitiated their original ustekinumab treatment regimen after loss of ≥ 50% of PASI improvement 85% regained PASI 75 response within 12 weeks after re-initiating therapy.
In Psoriasis Study 1, at week 2 and week 12, significantly greater improvements from baseline were demonstrated in the DLQI in each ustekinumab treatment group compared with placebo. The improvement was sustained through week 28. Similarly, significant improvements were seen in Psoriasis Study 2 at week 4 and 12, which were sustained through week 24. In Psoriasis Study 1, improvements in nail psoriasis (Nail Psoriasis Severity Index), in the physical and mental component summary scores of the SF-36 and in the Itch Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) were also significant in each ustekinumab treatment group compared with placebo. In Psoriasis Study 2, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and Work Limitations Questionnaire (WLQ) were also significantly improved in each ustekinumab treatment group compared with placebo.
Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) (Adults): Ustekinumab has been shown to improve signs and symptoms, physical function and health-related quality of life, and reduce the rate of progression of peripheral joint damage in adult patients with active PsA.
The safety and efficacy of ustekinumab was assessed in 927 patients in two randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies in patients with active PsA (≥ 5 swollen joints and ≥ 5 tender joints) despite non-steroidal anti-inflammatory (NSAID) or disease modifying antirheumatic (DMARD) therapy. Patients in these studies had a diagnosis of PsA for at least 6 months. Patients with each subtype of PsA were enrolled, including polyarticular arthritis with no evidence of rheumatoid nodules (39%), spondylitis with peripheral arthritis (28%), asymmetric peripheral arthritis (21%), distal interphalangeal involvement (12%) and arthritis mutilans (0.5%). Over 70% and 40% of the patients in both studies had enthesitis and dactylitis at baseline, respectively. Patients were randomised to receive treatment with ustekinumab 45 mg, 90 mg, or placebo subcutaneously at Weeks 0 and 4 followed by every 12 weeks (q12w) dosing. Approximately 50% of patients continued on stable doses of MTX (≤ 25 mg/week).
In PsA Study 1 (PSUMMIT I) and PsA Study 2 (PSUMMIT II), 80% and 86% of the patients, respectively, had been previously treated with DMARDs. In Study 1 previous treatment with anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF)α agent was not allowed. In Study 2, the majority of patients (58%, n = 180) had been previously treated with one or more anti-TNFα agent(s), of whom over 70% had discontinued their anti-TNFα treatment for lack of efficacy or intolerance at any time.
Signs and symptoms: Treatment with ustekinumab resulted in significant improvements in the measures of disease activity compared to placebo at week 24. The primary endpoint was the percentage of patients who achieved American College of Rheumatology (ACR) 20 response at week 24. The key efficacy results are shown in Table 3 as follows. (See Table 3.)

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ACR 20, 50 and 70 responses continued to improve or were maintained through week 52 (PsA Study 1 and 2) and week 100 (PsA Study 1). In PsA Study 1, ACR 20 responses at week 100 were achieved by 57% and 64%, for 45 mg and 90 mg, respectively. In PsA Study 2, ACR 20 responses at week 52 were achieved by 47% and 48%, for 45 mg and 90 mg, respectively.
The proportion of patients achieving a modified PsA response criteria (PsARC) response was also significantly greater in the ustekinumab groups compared to placebo at week 24. PsARC responses were maintained through weeks 52 and 100. A higher proportion of patients treated with ustekinumab who had spondylitis with peripheral arthritis as their primary presentation, demonstrated 50 and 70 percent improvement in Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI) scores compared with placebo at week 24.
Responses observed in the ustekinumab treated groups were similar in patients receiving and not receiving concomitant MTX, and were maintained through weeks 52 and 100. Patients previously treated with anti-TNFα agents who received ustekinumab achieved a greater response at week 24 than patients receiving placebo (ACR 20 response at week 24 for 45 mg and 90 mg was 37% and 34%, respectively, compared with placebo 15%; p < 0.05), and responses were maintained through week 52.
For patients with enthesitis and/or dactylitis at baseline, in PsA Study 1 significant improvement in enthesitis and dactylitis score was observed in the ustekinumab groups compared with placebo at week 24. In PsA Study 2 significant improvement in enthesitis score and numerical improvement (not statistically significant) in dactylitis score was observed in the ustekinumab 90 mg group compared with placebo at week 24. Improvements in enthesitis score and dactylitis score were maintained through weeks 52 and 100.
Radiographic Response: Structural damage in both hands and feet was expressed as change in total van der Heijde-Sharp score (vdH-S score), modified for PsA by addition of hand distal interphalangeal joints, compared to baseline. A pre-specified integrated analysis combining data from 927 subjects in both PsA Study 1 and 2 was performed. Ustekinumab demonstrated a statistically significant decrease in the rate of progression of structural damage compared to placebo, as measured by change from baseline to week 24 in the total modified vdH-S score (mean ± SD score was 0.97 ± 3.85 in the placebo group compared with 0.40 ± 2.11 and 0.39 ± 2.40 in the ustekinumab 45 mg (p < 0.05) and 90 mg (p < 0.001) groups, respectively). This effect was driven by PsA Study 1. The effect is considered demonstrated irrespective of concomitant MTX use, and was maintained through Weeks 52 (integrated analysis) and 100 (PsA Study 1).
Physical function and health-related quality of life: Ustekinumab-treated patients showed significant improvement in physical function as assessed by the Disability Index of the Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ-DI) at week 24. The proportion of patients achieving a clinically meaningful ≥ 0.3 improvement in HAQ-DI score from baseline was also significantly greater in the ustekinumab groups when compared with placebo. Improvement in HAQ-DI score from baseline was maintained through Weeks 52 and 100.
There was significant improvement in DLQI scores in the ustekinumab groups as compared with placebo at week 24, which was maintained through weeks 52 and 100. In PsA Study 2 there was a significant improvement in Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Fatigue (FACIT-F) scores in the ustekinumab groups when compared with placebo at week 24. The proportion of patients achieving a clinically significant improvement in fatigue (4 points in FACIT-F) was also significantly greater in the ustekinumab groups compared with placebo. Improvements in FACIT scores were maintained through week 52.
Soln for inj in pre-filled syringe & conc for soln for infusion: Crohn's Disease: The safety and efficacy of ustekinumab was assessed in three randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter studies in adult patients with moderately to severely active Crohn's disease (Crohn's Disease Activity Index [CDAI] score of ≥ 220 and ≤ 450). The clinical development program consisted of two 8-week intravenous induction studies (UNITI-1 and UNITI-2) followed by a 44 week subcutaneous randomized withdrawal maintenance study (IM-UNITI) representing 52 weeks of therapy.
The induction studies included 1409 (UNITI-1, n = 769; UNITI-2 n = 640) patients. The primary endpoint for both induction studies was the proportion of subjects in clinical response (defined as a reduction in CDAI score of ≥ 100 points) at week 6. Efficacy data were collected and analyzed through week 8 for both studies. Concomitant doses of oral corticosteroids, immunomodulators, aminosalicylates and antibiotics were permitted and 75% of patients continued to receive at least one of these medications. In both studies, patients were randomised to receive a single intravenous administration of either the recommended tiered dose of approximately 6 mg/kg (see Dosage & Administration, Table 6), a fixed dose of 130 mg ustekinumab, or placebo at week 0.
Patients in UNITI-1 had failed or were intolerant to prior anti-TNFα therapy. Approximately 48% of the patients had failed 1 prior anti-TNFα therapy and 52% had failed 2 or 3 prior anti-TNFα therapies. In this study, 29.1% of the patients had an inadequate initial response (primary non-responders), 69.4% responded but lost response (secondary non-responders), and 36.4% were intolerant to anti-TNFα therapies.
Patients in UNITI-2 had failed at least one conventional therapy, including corticosteroids or immunomodulators, and were either anti-TNF-α naive (68.6%) or had previously received but not failed anti-TNFα therapy (31.4%).
In both UNITI-1 and UNITI-2, a significantly greater proportion of patients were in clinical response and remission in the ustekinumab treated group compared to placebo (Table 4). Clinical response and remission were significant as early as week 3 in ustekinumab treated patients and continued to improve through week 8. In these induction studies, efficacy was higher and better sustained in the tiered dose group compared to the 130 mg dose group, and tiered dosing is therefore the recommended intravenous induction dose. (See Table 4.)

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The maintenance study (IM-UNITI), evaluated 388 patients who achieved 100 point clinical response at week 8 of induction with ustekinumab in studies UNITI-1 and UNITI-2. Patients were randomized to receive a subcutaneous maintenance regimen of either 90 mg ustekinumab every 8 weeks, 90 mg ustekinumab every 12 weeks or placebo for 44 weeks (for recommended maintenance posology, see Dosage & Administration).
Significantly higher proportions of patients maintained clinical remission and response in the ustekinumab treated groups compared to the placebo group at week 44 (see Table 5).

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In IM-UNITI, 29 of 129 patients did not maintain response to ustekinumab when treated every 12 weeks and were allowed to dose adjust to receive ustekinumab every 8 weeks. Loss of response was defined as a CDAI score ≥ 220 points and a ≥ 100 point increase from the CDAI score at baseline. In these patients, clinical remission was achieved in 41.4% of patients 16 weeks after dose adjustment.
Patients who were not in clinical response to ustekinumab induction at week 8 of the UNITI-1 and UNITI-2 induction studies (476 patients) entered into the non-randomized portion of the maintenance study (IM-UNITI) and received a 90 mg subcutaneous injection of ustekinumab at that time. Eight weeks later, 50.5% of the patients achieved clinical response and continued to receive maintenance dosing every 8 weeks; among these patients with continued maintenance dosing, a majority maintained response (68.1%) and achieved remission (50.2%) at week 44, at proportions that were similar to the patients who initially responded to ustekinumab induction.
Of 131 patients who responded to ustekinumab induction, and were randomized to the placebo group at the start of the maintenance study, 51 subsequently lost response and received 90 mg ustekinumab subcutaneously every 8 weeks. The majority of patients who lost response and resumed ustekinumab did so within 24 weeks of the induction infusion. Of these 51 patients, 70.6% achieved clinical response and 39.2% percent achieved clinical remission 16 weeks after receiving the first subcutaneous dose of ustekinumab.
Endoscopy: Endoscopic appearance of the mucosa was evaluated in 252 patients with eligible baseline endoscopic disease activity in a substudy. The primary endpoint was change from baseline in Simplified Endoscopic Disease Severity Score for Crohn's Disease (SES-CD), a composite score across 5 ileo-colonic segments of presence/size of ulcers, proportion of mucosal surface covered by ulcers, proportion of mucosal surface affected by any other lesions and presence/type of narrowing/strictures. At week 8, after a single intravenous induction dose, the change in SES-CD score was greater in the ustekinumab group (n = 155, mean change = -2.8) than in the placebo group (n = 97, mean change = -0.7, p = 0.012).
Fistula Response: In a subgroup of patients with draining fistulas at baseline (8.8%; n = 26), 12/15 (80%) of ustekinumab-treated patients achieved a fistula response over 44 weeks (defined as ≥ 50% reduction from baseline of the induction study in the number of draining fistulas) compared to 5/11 (45.5%) exposed to placebo.
Health-related quality of life: Health-related quality of life was assessed by IBDQ and SF-36 questionnaires. At week 8, patients receiving ustekinumab showed statistically significantly greater and clinically meaningful improvements on IBDQ total score and SF-36 Mental Component Summary Score in both UNITI-1 and UNITI-2, and SF-36 Physical Component Summary Score in UNITI-2, when compared to placebo. These improvements were generally better maintained in ustekinumab-treated patients in the IM-UNITI study through week 44 when compared to placebo.
Pharmacokinetics: Soln for inj in pre-filled syringe: Absorption: The median time to reach the maximum serum concentration (tmax) was 8.5 days after a single 90 mg subcutaneous administration in healthy subjects. The median tmax values of ustekinumab following a single subcutaneous administration of either 45 mg or 90 mg in patients with psoriasis were comparable to those observed in healthy subjects.
The absolute bioavailability of ustekinumab following a single subcutaneous administration was estimated to be 57.2% in patients with psoriasis.
Conc for soln for infusion: In patients with Crohn's disease, following the recommended intravenous induction dose, median peak serum ustekinumab concentration, observed 1 hour after the infusion, was 126.1 μg/mL.
Distribution: Median volume of distribution during the terminal phase (Vz) following a single intravenous administration to patients with psoriasis ranged from 57 to 83 mL/kg.
Biotransformation: The exact metabolic pathway for ustekinumab is unknown.
Elimination: Median systemic clearance (CL) following a single intravenous administration to patients with psoriasis ranged from 1.99 to 2.34 mL/day/kg. Median half-life (t1/2) of ustekinumab was approximately 3 weeks in patients with psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis or Crohn's disease, ranging from 15 to 32 days across all psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis studies.
Soln for inj in pre-filled syringe: In a population pharmacokinetic analysis, the apparent clearance (CL/F) and apparent volume of distribution (V/F) were 0.465 l/day and 15.7 l, respectively, in patients with psoriasis. The CL/F of ustekinumab was not impacted by gender. Population pharmacokinetic analysis showed that there was a trend towards a higher clearance of ustekinumab in patients who tested positive for antibodies to ustekinumab.
Dose linearity: The systemic exposure of ustekinumab (Cmax and AUC) increased in an approximately dose-proportional manner after a single intravenous administration at doses ranging from 0.09 mg/kg to 4.5 mg/kg or following a single subcutaneous administration at doses ranging from approximately 24 mg to 240 mg in patients with psoriasis.
Soln for inj in pre-filled syringe: Single dose versus multiple doses: Serum concentration-time profiles of ustekinumab were generally predictable after single or multiple subcutaneous dose administrations. In patients with psoriasis, steady-state serum concentrations of ustekinumab were achieved by Week 28 after initial subcutaneous doses at Weeks 0 and 4 followed by doses every 12 weeks. The median steady-state trough concentration ranged from 0.21 μg/mL to 0.26 μg/mL (45 mg) and from 0.47 μg/mL to 0.49 μg/mL (90 mg). There was no apparent accumulation in serum ustekinumab concentration over time when given subcutaneously every 12 weeks.
In patients with Crohn's disease, following an intravenous dose of ~6 mg/kg, starting at week 8, subcutaneous maintenance dosing of 90 mg ustekinumab was administered every 8 or 12 weeks. Steady state ustekinumab concentration was achieved by the start of the second maintenance dose. Median steady-state trough concentrations ranged from 1.97 μg/mL to 2.24 μg/ mL and from 0.61 μg/mL to 0.76 μg/mL for 90 mg ustekinumab every 8 weeks or every 12 weeks respectively. The steady-state trough ustekinumab levels resulting from 90 mg ustekinumab every 8 weeks were associated with higher clinical remission rates as compared to the steady-state trough levels following 90 mg every 12 weeks.
Impact of weight on pharmacokinetics: In a population pharmacokinetic analysis using data from patients with psoriasis, body weight was found to be the most significant covariate affecting the clearance of ustekinumab. The median CL/F in patients with weight > 100 kg was approximately 55% higher compared to patients with weight ≤ 100 kg. The median V/F in patients with weight > 100 kg was approximately 37% higher as compared to patients with weight ≤ 100 kg. The median trough serum concentrations of ustekinumab in patients with higher weight (> 100 kg) in the 90 mg group were comparable to those in patients with lower weight (≤ 100 kg) in the 45 mg group. Similar results were obtained from a confirmatory population pharmacokinetic analysis using data from patients with psoriatic arthritis.
Special populations: No pharmacokinetic data are available in patients with impaired renal or hepatic function.
No specific studies have been conducted in elderly patients or paediatric patients.
The pharmacokinetics of ustekinumab were generally comparable between Asian and non-Asian patients with psoriasis.
In patients with Crohn's disease, variability in ustekinumab CL was affected by body weight, serum albumin level, CRP, TNF antagonist failure status, sex, race (Asian versus non-Asian), and antibody to ustekinumab status while body weight was the main covariate affecting the volume of distribution. Concomitant use of immunomodulators did not have a significant impact on ustekinumab disposition. The impact of these statistically significant covariates on the respective PK parameters was within ± 20% when evaluated across a representative range of covariate values or categories in the data which is within the overall variability observed in the PK of ustekinumab.
Soln for inj in pre-filled syringe: In the population pharmacokinetic analysis, there were no indications of an effect of tobacco or alcohol on the pharmacokinetics of ustekinumab.
Serum ustekinumab concentrations in paediatric psoriasis patients 12 to 17 years of age, treated with the recommended weight-based dose were generally comparable to those in the adult psoriasis population treated with the adult dose, while serum ustekinumab concentrations in paediatric psoriasis patients treated with half of the recommended weight-based dose were generally lower than those in adults.
Regulation of CYP450 enzymes: The effects of IL-12 or IL-23 on the regulation of CYP450 enzymes were evaluated in an in vitro study using human hepatocytes, which showed that IL-12 and/or IL-23 at levels of 10 ng/mL did not alter human CYP450 enzyme activities (CYP1A2, 2B6, 2C9, 2C19, 2D6, or 3A4; Interactions).
Toxicology: Preclinical safety data: Non-clinical data reveal no special hazard (e.g. organ toxicity) for humans based on studies of repeated-dose toxicity and developmental and reproductive toxicity, including safety pharmacology evaluations. In developmental and reproductive toxicity studies in cynomolgus monkeys, neither adverse effects on male fertility indices nor birth defects or developmental toxicity were observed. No adverse effects on female fertility indices were observed using an analogous antibody to IL-12/23 in mice.
Dose levels in animal studies were up to approximately 45-fold higher than the highest equivalent dose intended to be administered to psoriasis patients and resulted in peak serum concentrations in monkeys that were more than 100-fold higher than observed in humans.
Carcinogenicity studies were not performed with ustekinumab due to the lack of appropriate models for an antibody with no cross-reactivity to rodent IL-12/23 p40.
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