Benlysta

Benlysta

belimumab

Manufacturer:

GlaxoSmithKline

Distributor:

Zuellig Pharma
Full Prescribing Info
Contents
Belimumab.
Description
Each vial contains a sufficient amount of belimumab to deliver 120 mg in 1.5 mL when reconstituted as recommended with sterile Water for Injections. After reconstitution, each mL of solution contains 80 mg belimumab.
Sterile lyophilised powder in a single use vial.
Belimumab is a recombinant, fully human IgG1λ monoclonal antibody.
Lyophilized powder for intravenous infusion in sterile single-use vials. The lyophilized powder is reconstituted with sterile water for injection (WFI) prior to use. Post-reconstitution, the appearance for the solution is a colorless to pale yellow solution.
Excipients/Inactive Ingredients: Citric acid monohydrate, Sodium citrate dihydrate, Sucrose, Polysorbate 80.
Action
Pharmacology: Pharmacodynamics: Mechanism of Action: B-Lymphocyte Stimulator (BLyS, also referred to as BAFF and TNFSF13), a member of the tumour necrosis factor (TNF) ligand family, inhibits B cell apoptosis and stimulates the differentiation of B cells into immunoglobulin-producing plasma cells. BLyS is overexpressed in patients with SLE, leading to elevated plasma BLyS levels. There is a strong association between SLE disease activity (as assessed by the Safety of Estrogen in Lupus Erythematosus National Assessment-Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index [SELENA-SLEDAI]) and plasma BLyS levels.
Belimumab is a fully human IgG1λ monoclonal antibody that specifically binds to soluble human BLyS and inhibits its biological activity. Belimumab does not bind B cells directly, but by binding BLyS, belimumab inhibits the survival of B cells, including autoreactive B cells, and reduces the differentiation of B cells into immunoglobulin producing plasma cells.
Pharmacodynamic Effect: Reductions in elevated levels of serum IgG and in anti-dsDNA antibodies were observed as early as Week 8 and continued to Week 52. In patients with hypergammaglobulinaemia at baseline, normalisation of IgG levels was observed by week 52 in 49% and 20% of patients receiving belimumab and placebo, respectively. In patients with anti-dsDNA antibodies at baseline, reductions in patients receiving belimumab were evident as early as Week 8, and by Week 52, 16% of patients treated with belimumab had converted to anti-dsDNA negative compared with 7% of the patients receiving placebo.
In patients with low complement levels at baseline, belimumab treatment resulted in increases in complement which were seen as early as Week 4 and continued over time.
By Week 52, levels of C3 and C4 had normalised in 38% and 44% of patients receiving belimumab compared with 17% and 19% of patients receiving placebo.
The target of belimumab, BLyS, is a critical cytokine for B-cell survival, differentiation, and proliferation.
Belimumab significantly reduced circulating B cells, naive, activated, plasma, and the SLE B cell subset at Week 52. Reductions in naive, plasma and short-lived plasma cells as well as the SLE B cell subset were observed as early as Week 8. Memory cells increased initially and slowly declined toward baseline levels by Week 52.
In a long-term uncontrolled extension study, B cells (including naive, activated, plasma cells and the SLE B cell subset) and IgG levels were followed for more than 7 years with ongoing treatment. A substantial and sustained decrease in various B cell subsets was observed leading to median reductions of 87% in naive B cells, 67% in memory B cells, 99% in activated B cells, and 92% in plasma cells after more than 7 years of treatment. After about 7 years, a 28% median reduction in IgG levels was observed with 1.6% of subjects experiencing a decrease in IgG levels to below 400 mg/dL. Over the course of the study, the reported incidence of AEs generally remained stable or declined.
Immunogenicity: In the two Phase III studies, 4 out of 563 (0.7%) patients in the 10 mg/kg group and 27 out of 559 (4.8%) patients in the 1 mg/kg group developed persistent anti-belimumab antibodies. The reported frequency for the 10 mg/kg group may underestimate the actual frequency due to lower assay sensitivity in the presence of high drug concentrations.
Neutralising antibodies were detected in three patients receiving belimumab 1 mg/kg.
However, the presence of anti-belimumab antibodies was relatively uncommon and no definitive conclusions can be drawn regarding the effect of immunogenicity on belimumab pharmacokinetics due to low numbers of anti-belimumab antibody positive subjects.
Clinical Studies: The efficacy of BENLYSTA was evaluated in two randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled Phase III studies in 1,684 patients with a clinical diagnosis of SLE according to the American College of Rheumatology classification criteria. Eligible patients had active SLE disease, defined as a SELENA-SLEDAI score greater than or equal to 6 and positive anti-nuclear antibody (ANA or anti-dsDNA) test results (ANA titre greater than or equal to 1:80 and/or a positive anti-dsDNA [greater than or equal to 30 units/mL]) at screening. Patients were on a stable SLE treatment regimen (standard of care) consisting of any of the following (alone or in combination): corticosteroids, anti-malarials, NSAIDs or other immunosuppressives. Patients were excluded from the study if they had severe active central nervous system lupus or severe active lupus nephritis, had ever received treatment with any B cell targeted therapy, if they had received another biological investigational agent in the previous year, or if they had a positive response to testing for HIV antibody, hepatitis B surface antigen, or hepatitis C antibody. The two studies were similar in design except that Study 1 was a 76-week study and Study 2 was a 52-week study. Both studies had 52 week primary endpoints.
Study 1 (HGS1006-C1056) was conducted primarily in North America and Western Europe. The racial distribution was 70% white/Caucasian, 14% black/African American, 13% Alaska native or American Indian, and 3% Asian. Background medications included corticosteroids (76%), immunosuppressives (56%), and anti-malarials (63%).
Study 2 (HGS1006-C1057) was conducted in South America, Eastern Europe, Asia, and Australia. The racial distribution was 38% Asian, 26% white/Caucasian, 32% Alaska native or American Indian, and 4% black/African American. Background medications included corticosteroids (96%), immunosuppressives (42%), and anti-malarials (67%).
Patient median age across both studies was 37 years (range: 18 to 73 years), and the majority (94%) were female. At screening, patients were stratified by disease severity based on their SELENA-SLEDAI score (less than or equal to 9 vs greater than or equal to 10), proteinuria level (less than 2 g per 24 hr vs greater than or equal to 2 g per 24 hr), and race, and then randomly assigned to receive BENLYSTA 1 mg/kg, BENLYSTA 10 mg/kg, or placebo in addition to standard of care. The patients were administered study medication intravenously over a 1-hour period on Days 0, 14, 28, and then every 28 days for 48 or 72 weeks.
The primary efficacy endpoint was a composite endpoint (SLE Responder Index) that defined response as meeting each of the following criteria at Week 52 compared with baseline: greater than or equal to 4-point reduction in the SELENA-SLEDAI score, and no new British Isles Lupus Assessment Group (BILAG) A organ domain score or two new BILAG B organ domain scores, and no worsening (less than 0.30 point increase) in Physician's Global Assessment score (PGA).
The SLE Responder Index uses the SELENA-SLEDAI score as an objective measure of reduction in global disease activity; the BILAG index to ensure no significant worsening in any specific organ system; and the PGA to ensure that improvements in disease activity are not achieved at the expense of the patient's overall condition.
BENLYSTA produced significant improvements in the SLE Responder Index as well as in the individual component SELENA-SLEDAI score in both studies, (see Table 1).

Click on icon to see table/diagram/image

In a pooled analysis of the two studies, the percentage of patients receiving greater than 7.5 mg/ day prednisone (or equivalent) at baseline whose average corticosteroid dose was reduced by at least 25% from baseline to a dose equivalent to prednisone less than or equal to 7.5 mg/day during Weeks 40 through 52, was 17.9% in the group receiving belimumab and 12.3% in the group receiving placebo (P=0.0451).
Flares in SLE were defined by the Modified SELENA-SLEDAI SLE Flare Index where the modification excludes severe flares that are triggered only by an increase of SELENA-SLEDAI score to greater than 12. The median time to the first flare was delayed in the pooled group receiving belimumab compared to the group receiving placebo (hazard ratio=0.84, P=0.012). The risk of severe flares was also reduced by 36% over the 52 weeks of observation in the group receiving belimumab compared to the group receiving placebo (hazard ratio=0.64, P=0.0011).
Univariate and multivariate analysis of the primary endpoint demonstrated that the greatest benefit was observed in patients with higher disease activity including patients with SELENA-SLEDAI scores greater than or equal to 10, patients requiring steroids to control their disease, and patients with low complement levels.
Post-hoc analysis identified a high responding subgroup as those patients with low complement and positive anti-dsDNA at baseline, see Table 2. Of these patients, 64.5% had SELENA-SLEDAI scores greater than or equal to 10 at baseline. (See Table 2.)

Click on icon to see table/diagram/image

There were too few males, patients over 65 years of age, or black/African American patients enrolled in the controlled clinical trials to draw meaningful conclusions about the effects of gender, age, or race on clinical outcomes.
Pharmacokinetics: The pharmacokinetic parameters as follows are based on population parameter estimates which are specific to the 563 patients who received belimumab 10 mg/kg in the two Phase III studies.
Absorption: Belimumab is administered by intravenous infusion. Maximum serum concentrations of belimumab were generally observed at, or shortly after, the end of the infusion. The maximum serum concentration was 313 micrograms/mL based on simulating the concentration time profile using the typical parameter values of the population pharmacokinetic model.
Distribution: Belimumab distributed to tissues with an overall volume of distribution of 5.29 L.
Metabolism: Belimumab is a protein for which the expected metabolic pathway is degradation to small peptides and individual amino acids by widely distributed proteolytic enzymes. Classical biotransformation studies have not been conducted.
Elimination: Serum belimumab concentrations declined in a bi-exponential manner, with a distribution half-life of 1.75 days and terminal half-life 19.4 days. The systemic clearance was 215 mL/day.
Drug interactions: Concomitant use of mycophenolate mofetil, azathioprine, methotrexate and hydroxychloroquine did not substantially influence belimumab pharmacokinetics based on the results of the population pharmacokinetic analysis. Neither did a wide range of other co-medications (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications, aspirin, and HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors) significantly influence belimumab pharmacokinetics. Co-administration of steroids and ACE inhibitors resulted in a statistically significant increase of systemic clearance in the population pharmacokinetic analysis. However, these effects were not clinically meaningful as their magnitude was well within the range of normal variability of clearance.
Special Patient Groups: Elderly: Belimumab has been studied in a limited number of elderly patients. Within the overall SLE intravenous study population, age did not affect belimumab exposure in the population pharmacokinetic analysis. However, given the small number of subjects 65 years or older, an effect of age cannot be ruled out conclusively.
Children and adolescents: No pharmacokinetic data are available in paediatric patients.
Renal impairment: No formal studies were conducted to examine the effects of renal impairment on the pharmacokinetics of belimumab. During clinical development, belimumab was studied in a limited number of SLE patients with renal impairment (creatinine clearance less than 60 mL/min, including a small number with creatinine clearance less than 30 mL/min). Although proteinuria (greater than or equal to 2 g/day) increased belimumab clearance, and decreases in creatinine clearance decreased belimumab clearance, these effects were within the expected range of variability. Therefore, no dose adjustment is recommended for patients with renal impairment.
Hepatic impairment: No formal studies were conducted to examine the effects of hepatic impairment on the pharmacokinetics of belimumab. IgG1 molecules such as belimumab are catabolised by widely distributed proteolytic enzymes, which are not restricted to hepatic tissue; therefore, changes in hepatic function are unlikely to have any effect on the elimination of belimumab.
Other patient characteristics: There was no significant effect of gender, race or ethnicity on the pharmacokinetics of belimumab. The effects of body size on belimumab exposure are accounted for by weight normalised dosing.
Toxicology: Pre-clinical Safety Data: Non-clinical data revealed no special hazard for humans based on studies of repeated dose toxicity and toxicity to reproduction.
Intravenous and subcutaneous administration to monkeys resulted in the expected reduction in number of peripheral and lymphoid tissue B-cell counts with no associated toxicological findings.
Reproductive studies have been performed in pregnant cynomolgus monkeys receiving belimumab 150 mg/kg by intravenous infusion (approximately nine times the anticipated maximum human clinical exposure) every two weeks for up to 21 weeks, and belimumab treatment was not associated with direct or indirect harmful effects with respect to maternal toxicity, developmental toxicity, or teratogenicity. Treatment-related findings were limited to the expected reversible reduction of B cells in both dams and infants and reversible reduction of IgM in infant monkeys. B cell numbers recovered after the cessation of belimumab treatment by about 1 year post-partum in adult monkeys and by three months of life in infant monkeys; IgM levels in infants exposed to belimumab in utero recovered by six months of age.
As belimumab is a monoclonal antibody, no genotoxicity studies have been conducted. No carcinogenicity or fertility studies (male or female) have been performed.
Indications/Uses
BENLYSTA is indicated for reducing disease activity in adult patients with active autoantibody positive systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) who are receiving standard therapy.
Benlysta has not been studied in the following patient groups, and is not recommended in: Severe active central nervous system lupus, Severe active lupus nephritis.
Dosage/Direction for Use
Discontinuation of treatment with BENLYSTA should be considered if there is no improvement in disease control after 6 months of treatment.
BENLYSTA is administered intravenously by infusion, and must be reconstituted and diluted prior to administration (see Use and Handling under Cautions for Usage).
BENLYSTA treatment should be initiated and supervised by a qualified physician experienced in the diagnosis and treatment of SLE.
BENLYSTA should be administered by a healthcare professional prepared to treat hypersensitivity reactions including anaphylaxis.
BENLYSTA should be infused over a 1-hour period.
BENLYSTA must not be administered as an intravenous push or bolus.
The infusion rate may be slowed or interrupted if the patient develops an infusion reaction. The infusion must be discontinued immediately if the patient experiences a potentially life-threatening adverse reaction (see Contraindications, Precautions).
Patients should be monitored during and for an appropriate period of time after administration of BENLYSTA (see Precautions, Adverse Reactions).
Premedication for patients with allergies: Premedication with an oral antihistamine, with or without an antipyretic, may be administered before the infusion of BENLYSTA (see Pharmacology: Pharmacodynamics: Clinical Studies under Actions and Precautions).
Adults: The recommended dosage regimen is 10 mg/kg on Days 0, 14 and 28, and at 4-week intervals thereafter.
Children: BENLYSTA has not been studied in patients less than 18 years of age. There are no data on the safety and efficacy of BENLYSTA in this age group.
Elderly: The efficacy and safety of Benlysta in the elderly has not been established. Data on patients >65 years are limited to < 1.6% of the studied population. Therefore, the use of Benlysta in elderly patients is not recommended unless the benefits are expected to outweigh the risks. In case administration of BENLYSTA to elderly patient is deemed necessary, dose adjustment is not required (see Pharmacology: Pharmacokinetics: Special Patient Groups under Actions).
Renal impairment: No formal studies of BENLYSTA have been performed in patients with renal impairment.
BENLYSTA has been studied in a limited number of SLE patients with renal impairment. Dosage adjustment is not required in patients with renal impairment (see Pharmacology: Pharmacokinetics: Special Patient Groups under Actions).
Hepatic impairment: No formal studies of BENLYSTA have been performed in patients with hepatic impairment. However, patients with hepatic impairment are unlikely to require dose modification (see Pharmacology: Pharmacokinetics: Special Patient Groups under Actions).
Overdosage
There is limited experience with overdosage of BENLYSTA. Adverse reactions reported in association with cases of overdose have been consistent with those expected for belimumab.
Two doses up to 20 mg/kg administered 21 days apart by intravenous infusion have been given to humans with no increase in incidence or severity of adverse reactions compared with doses of 1, 4, or 10 mg/kg.
Contraindications
BENLYSTA is contraindicated in patients who have demonstrated anaphylaxis to BENLYSTA.
Special Precautions
Concomitant use with B cell targeted therapy and cyclophosphamide: BENLYSTA has not been studied in combination with other B cell targeted therapy or intravenous cyclophosphamide. Therefore, use of BENLYSTA is not recommended in combination with biologic therapies (eg: rituximab) or intravenous cyclophosphamide.
Infusion reactions and hypersensitivity: Administration of BENLYSTA may result in infusion and hypersensitivity reactions, which can be severe, and can be fatal. In the event of a severe reaction, BENLYSTA administration must be interrupted and appropriate medical therapy administered. Patients with a history of multiple drug allergies or significant hypersensitivity may be at increased risk (see Adverse Reactions).
Premedication with an oral antihistamine, with or without an antipyretic, may be administered before the infusion of BENLYSTA. There is insufficient evidence to determine whether premedication diminishes the frequency or severity of infusion reactions. In clinical trials, serious infusion and hypersensitivity reactions affected less than 1% of patients, and included anaphylactic reaction, bradycardia, hypotension, angioedema, and dyspnea. Infusion reactions occurred more frequently on the first two infusion days and tended to decrease with subsequent infusions. Delay in the onset of acute hypersensitivity reactions has been observed. Therefore, patients should be monitored during and for an appropriate period of time after administration of BENLYSTA. Patients treated with BENLYSTA should be made aware of the potential risk, the signs and symptoms of such reactions, and the importance of immediately seeking medical attention. Delayed-type, non-acute hypersensitivity reactions have also been observed and included symptoms such as rash, nausea, fatigue, myalgia, headache, and facial oedema.
Risk of infections: As with other immunomodulating agents, the mechanism of action of BENLYSTA may increase the risk for the development of infections. Severe infections, including fatal cases, have been reported in SLE patients receiving immunosuppressant therapy, including BENLYSTA (see Adverse Reactions). Patients who develop an infection while undergoing treatment with BENLYSTA should be monitored closely, and consideration should be given to stopping immunosuppressant therapy. Physicians should exercise caution when considering the use of BENLYSTA in patients with severe or chronic infections.
Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML): Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) resulting in neurological deficits, including fatal cases, has been reported in SLE patients receiving immunosuppressant pharmacotherapy, including BENLYSTA. A diagnosis of PML should be considered in any patient presenting with new-onset or deteriorating neurological signs and symptoms. The patient should be referred to a neurologist or other appropriate specialist for evaluation and if PML is confirmed, consideration should be given to stopping immunosuppressant therapy, including BENLYSTA.
Risk of malignancies: As with other immunomodulating agents, the mechanism of action of BENLYSTA may increase the potential risk for the development of malignancies. In clinical trials, there was no difference in the rate of malignancies between BENLYSTA-treated and placebo-treated groups.
Immunisation: Live vaccines should not be given for 30 days before, or concurrently with BENLYSTA as clinical safety has not been established. No data are available on the secondary transmission of infection from persons receiving live vaccines to patients receiving BENLYSTA.
Because of its mechanism of action, BENLYSTA may interfere with the response to immunisations. However, in a study evaluating the response to a 23-valent pneumococcal vaccine, overall immune responses to the different serotypes were similar in SLE patients receiving belimumab compared with those not receiving treatment at the time of vaccination.
Limited data suggest that BENLYSTA does not significantly affect the ability to maintain a protective immune response to immunisations received prior to administration of BENLYSTA.
Effects on Ability to Drive and Use Machines: There have been no studies to investigate the effect of BENLYSTA on driving performance or the ability to operate machinery. No detrimental effects on such activities are predicted from the pharmacology of BENLYSTA.
The clinical status of the patient and the safety profile of BENLYSTA should be borne in mind when considering the patient's ability to perform tasks that require judgement, motor or cognitive skills.
Use In Pregnancy & Lactation
Fertility: There are no data on the effects of BENLYSTA on human fertility. Effects on male and female fertility have not been evaluated in animal studies (see Pharmacology: Toxicology: Pre-clinical Safety Data under Actions).
Pregnancy: There are limited data on the use of BENLYSTA in pregnant women. No formal studies have been conducted. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies, including belimumab, can cross the placenta. BENLYSTA should be used during pregnancy only if the potential benefit justifies the potential risk to the foetus.
If prevention of pregnancy is warranted, women of childbearing potential should use adequate contraception while using BENLYSTA and for at least four months after the last BENLYSTA treatment.
Animal studies did not indicate direct or indirect harmful effects with respect to maternal toxicity, pregnancy or embryofoetal development. Treatment-related findings were limited to reversible reductions in B cells in infant monkeys (see Pharmacology: Toxicology: Pre-clinical Safety Data under Actions). Monitor infants of treated mothers for B-cell reduction and depending upon the results, consider delaying infant vaccination with live viral vaccines. B-cell reduction in infants may also interfere with the response to immunisations (see Precautions).
Lactation: The safety of BENLYSTA for use during lactation has not been established. There are no data regarding the excretion of belimumab in human milk, or systemic absorption of belimumab after ingestion. Although belimumab was excreted into the milk of cynomolgous monkeys, published literature suggests that human neonatal and infant consumption of breast milk does not result in clinically significant absorption of maternal IgG antibodies into circulation.
It is recommended that a decision should be made about BENLYSTA therapy in breast-feeding mothers, taking into account the importance of breast-feeding to the infant and the importance of the drug to the mother, and any potential adverse effects on the breastfed child from belimumab or from the underlying maternal condition.
Adverse Reactions
The safety of BENLYSTA in patients with SLE has been evaluated in three placebo-controlled intravenous studies.
The data described as follows reflect exposure to BENLYSTA (10 mg/kg intravenously over a 1-hour period on Days 0, 14, 28, and then every 28 days up to 52 weeks) in 674 patients with SLE, including 472 exposed for up to 52 weeks. The safety data presented include data beyond Week 52 in some patients. Data from postmarketing reports are also included.
The majority of patients were also receiving one or more of the following concomitant treatments for SLE: corticosteroids, immunomodulatory agents, anti-malarials, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Adverse reactions are listed as follows by MedDRA body system organ class and by frequency. The frequency categories used are: Very common ≥ 1 in 10, Common ≥ 1 in 100 and < 1 in 10, Uncommon ≥ 1 in 1,000 and < 1 in 100. (See Table 3.)

Click on icon to see table/diagram/image

Hypersensitivity reactions: Clinically significant hypersensitivity reactions associated with BENLYSTA and requiring permanent treatment discontinuation were reported in 0.4% of patients. These reactions were generally observed on the day of the infusion, and patients with a history of multiple drug allergies or significant hypersensitivity reactions may be at increased risk. Delay in the onset of acute hypersensitivity reactions for several hours after the infusion, and recurrence of clinically significant reactions after initial resolution of symptoms following appropriate treatment, have been observed. Delayed-type, non-acute hypersensitivity reactions have also been observed and included symptoms such as rash, nausea, fatigue, myalgia, headache, and facial oedema.
Infections: In clinical sudies, the overall incidence of infections was 70% in the group receiving belimumab and 67% in the group receiving placebo. Infections occurring in at least 3% of patients receiving belimumab and at least 1% more frequently than patients receiving placebo were nasopharyngitis, bronchitis, pharyngitis, cystitis, and gastroenteritis viral. Serious infections occurred in 5% of patients receiving either belimumab or placebo; serious opportunistic infections accounted for <1% and 0% of these, respectively. Some infections were severe or fatal.
Drug Interactions
No drug interaction studies have been conducted with BENLYSTA.
In clinical trials of patients with SLE, concomitant administration of mycophenolate mofetil, azathioprine, hydroxychloroquine, methotrexate, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications, aspirin, and HMG CoA reductase inhibitors had no significant effect on belimumab exposures (see Pharmacology: Pharmacokinetics under Actions).
Caution For Usage
Instructions for Use/Handling: Reconstitution and dilution: BENLYSTA does not contain a preservative; therefore reconstitution and dilution must be carried out under aseptic conditions.
Allow 10 to 15 minutes for the vial to warm to room temperature.
It is recommended that a 21-25 gauge needle be used when piercing the vial stopper for reconstitution and dilution.
The 120 mg single-use vial of BENLYSTA should be reconstituted with 1.5 mL of sterile Water for Injections to yield a final concentration of 80 mg/mL belimumab. The 400 mg single-use vial of BENLYSTA should be reconstituted with 4.8 mL of sterile Water for Injections to yield a final concentration of 80 mg/mL belimumab.
The stream of sterile water should be directed toward the side of the vial to minimise foaming. Gently swirl the vial for 60 seconds. Allow the vial to sit at room temperature during reconstitution, gently swirling the vial for 60 seconds every five minutes until the powder is dissolved. Do not shake.
Reconstitution is typically complete within 10 to 15 minutes after the sterile water has been added, but it may take up to 30 minutes. Protect the reconstituted solution from direct sunlight.
If a mechanical reconstitution device is used to reconstitute BENLYSTA it should not exceed 500 rpm and the vial should be swirled for no longer than 30 minutes.
Once reconstitution is complete, the solution should be opalescent and colourless to pale yellow, and without particles. Small air bubbles, however, are expected and acceptable.
The reconstituted product is diluted to 250 mL with 0.9% sodium chloride (normal saline), 0.45% sodium chloride (half normal saline) or Lactated Ringer's solution for intravenous infusion.
5% Dextrose intravenous solutions are incompatible with BENLYSTA and should not be used.
From a 250 mL infusion bag or bottle of normal saline, half normal saline, or Lactated Ringer's solution, withdraw and discard a volume equal to the volume of the reconstituted BENLYSTA solution required for the patient's dose. Then add the required volume of the reconstituted BENLYSTA solution into the infusion bag or bottle. Gently invert the bag or bottle to mix the solution. Any unused solution in the vials must be discarded.
Inspect the BENLYSTA solution visually for particulate matter and discoloration prior to administration. Discard the solution if any particulate matter or discoloration is observed.
The reconstituted solution, if not used immediately, should be protected from direct sunlight and stored refrigerated at 2°C to 8°C. Solutions diluted in normal saline, half normal saline, or Lactated Ringer's solution may be stored at 2°C to 8°C or room temperature.
The total time from reconstitution of BENLYSTA to completion of infusion should not exceed eight hours.
Administration: BENLYSTA should be infused over a 1-hour period.
BENLYSTA should not be infused concomitantly in the same intravenous line with other agents. No physical or biochemical compatibility studies have been conducted to evaluate the co-administration of BENLYSTA with other agents.
No incompatibilities between BENLYSTA and polyvinylchloride or polyolefin bags have been observed.
Incompatibilities: BENLYSTA is not compatible with 5% dextrose.
BENLYSTA must be prepared and administered only as directed, see Instructions for Use /Handling as previously mentioned.
Storage
Unopened vials: Store at between 2°C and 8°C.
Do not freeze.
Protect from light.
Reconstituted solution: After reconstitution with Water for Injections, and dilution in 0.9% sodium chloride (normal saline), 0.45% sodium chloride (half normal saline), or Lactated Ringer's solution, the product is stable for up to 8 hours at 2°C to 8°C or at room temperature. Protect from direct sunlight.
MIMS Class
ATC Classification
L04AA26 - belimumab ; Belongs to the class of selective immunosuppressive agents. Used to induce immunosuppression.
Presentation/Packing
Powd for infusion 120 mg (colourless to pale yellow soln in vial) x 5 mL x 1's.
Register or sign in to continue
Asia's one-stop resource for medical news, clinical reference and education
Sign up for free
Already a member? Sign in