NEW HIGHLIGHT
Cabometyx

Cabometyx Adverse Reactions

cabozantinib

Manufacturer:

Ipsen Pharma

Distributor:

Zuellig Pharma
Full Prescribing Info
Adverse Reactions
Summary of safety profile: The most common serious adverse drug reactions in the RCC population (≥1% incidence) are diarrhoea, hypertension, dehydration, hyponatraemia, nausea, decreased appetite, embolism, fatigue, hypomagnesaemia, palmar-plantar erythrodysaesthesia syndrome (PPES).
The most frequent adverse reactions of any grade (experienced by at least 25% of patients) in the RCC population included diarrhoea, hypertension, fatigue, AST increased, ALT increased, nausea, decreased appetite, PPES, dysgeusia, platelet count decreased, stomatitis, anaemia, vomiting, weight decreased, dyspepsia, and constipation. Hypertension was observed more frequently in the treatment naïve RCC population (67%) compared to RCC patients following prior VEGF-targeted therapy (37%).
The most common serious adverse drug reactions in the HCC population (≥1% incidence) are hepatic encephalopathy, palmar-plantar erythrodysaesthesia syndrome, asthenia and diarrhoea.
The most frequent adverse reactions of any grade (experienced by at least 25% of patients) in the HCC population included diarrhoea, palmar-plantar erythrodysaesthesia syndrome, fatigue, decreased appetite hypertension and nausea.
Tabulated list of adverse reactions: Adverse reactions are listed in Table 6 according to MedDRA system organ class and frequency categories. Frequencies are based on all grades and defined as: very common (≥1/10), common (≥1/100 to <1/10); uncommon (≥1/1,000 to <1/100); not known (cannot be estimated from the available data). Within each frequency grouping, adverse reactions are presented in order of decreasing seriousness. (See Table 6.)

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Description of selected adverse reactions: Data for the following reactions are based on patients who received Cabometyx 60 mg qd po in the pivotal studies in RCC following prior VEGF-targeted therapy and in treatment-naïve RCC and in HCC following prior systemic therapy (see Pharmacology: Pharmacodynamics under Actions).
Gastrointestinal (GI) perforation: In the study in RCC following prior VEGF-targeted therapy (METEOR), GI perforations were reported in 0.9% (3/331) of cabozantinib-treated RCC patients. Events were Grade 2 or 3. Median time to onset was 10.0 weeks.
In the treatment-naïve RCC study (CABOSUN), GI perforations were reported in 2.6% (2/78) of cabozantinib-treated patients. Events were Grade 4 and 5.
In the HCC study (CELESTIAL), GI perforations were reported in 0.9% of cabozantinib-treated patients (4/467). All events were Grade 3 or 4. Median time to onset was 5.9 weeks.
Fatal perforations have occurred in the cabozantinib clinical program.
Hepatic encephalopathy: In the HCC study (CELESTIAL), hepatic encephalopathy (hepatic encephalopathy, encephalopathy, hyperammonaemic encephalopathy) was reported in 5.6% of cabozantinib-treated patients (26/467); Grade 3-4 events in 2.8%, and one (0.2%) Grade 5 event. Median time to onset was 5.9 weeks. No cases of hepatic encephalopathy were reported in the RCC studies (METEOR and CABOSUN).
Diarrhoea: In the study in RCC following prior VEGF-targeted therapy (METEOR), diarrhoea was reported in 74% of cabozantinib-treated RCC patients (245/331); Grade 3-4 events in 11%. Median time to onset was 4.9 weeks.
In the treatment-naïve RCC study (CABOSUN), diarrhoea was reported in 73% of cabozantinib-treated patients (57/78); Grade 3-4 events in 10%. In the HCC study (CELESTIAL), diarrhoea was reported in 54% of cabozantinib-treated patients (251/467); Grade 3-4 events in 9.9%. Median time to onset of all events was 4.1 weeks. Diarrhoea led to dose modifications, interruptions and discontinuations in 84/467 (18%), 69/467 (15%) and 5/467 (1%) of subjects, respectively.
Fistulas:
In the study in RCC following prior VEGF-targeted therapy (METEOR), fistulas were reported in 1.2% (4/331) of cabozantinib-treated patients and included anal fistulas in 0.6% (2/331) cabozantinib-treated patients. One event was Grade 3; the remainder were Grade 2. Median time to onset was 30.3 weeks. In the treatment-naïve RCC study (CABOSUN), no cases of fistulas were reported. In the HCC study (CELESTIAL), fistulas were reported in 1.5% (7/467) of the HCC patients. Median time to onset was 14 weeks. Fatal fistulas have occurred in the cabozantinib clinical program.
Haemorrhage:
In the study in RCC following prior VEGF-targeted therapy (METEOR), the incidence of severe haemorrhagic events (Grade ≥ 3) was 2.1% (7/331) in cabozantinib-treated RCC patients. Median time to onset was 20.9 weeks. In the treatment-naïve RCC study (CABOSUN), the incidence of severe haemorrhagic events (Grade ≥ 3) was 5.1% (4/78) in cabozantinib-treated RCC patients. In the HCC study (CELESTIAL), the incidence of severe haemorrhagic events (Grade ≥ 3) was 7.3% in cabozantinib-treated patients (34/467). Median time to onset was 9.1 weeks. Fatal haemorrhages have occurred in the cabozantinib clinical program.
Reversible Posterior Leukoencephalopathy Syndrome (RPLS): No case of RPLS was reported in the METEOR or CABOSUN or CELESTIAL studies, but RPLS has been reported rarely in other clinical studies (in 2/4872 subjects; 0.04%).
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