Malarone

Malarone Dosage/Direction for Use

atovaquone + proguanil

Manufacturer:

GlaxoSmithKline

Distributor:

Zuellig Pharma
Full Prescribing Info
Dosage/Direction for Use
The daily dose should be taken with food or a milky drink at the same time each day.
In the event of vomiting within 1 hour of dosing a repeat dose should be taken.
Prophylaxis: Prophylaxis should start 1 or 2 days before entering a malaria-endemic area, and be continued daily until 7 days after leaving the area.
Dosage in Adults: One Malarone tablet (adult strength; 250mg atovaquone/100 mg proguanil) daily.
Dosage in Children: (See Table 1.)

Click on icon to see table/diagram/image

Treatment: Dosage in Adults: Four MALARONE tablets (adult strength; total daily dose 1g atovaquone/400 mg proguanil hydrochloride) as a single dose for three consecutive days.
Dosage in Children: (See Table 2.)

Click on icon to see table/diagram/image

Use in Children below 11kg: The usage has not been established.
Dosage in the Elderly (Prophylaxis and Treatment): A pharmacokinetic study indicates that no dosage adjustments are needed in the elderly (see Pharmacology: Pharmacokinetics under Actions).
Dosage in Renal Impairment (Prophylaxis and Treatment): Pharmacokinetic studies indicate that no dosage adjustments are needed in patients with mild to moderate renal impairment. In patients with severe renal impairment (creatinine clearance less than 30 mL/min) alternatives to MALARONE should be recommended for treatment of acute P. falciparum malaria whenever possible (see Pharmacology: Pharmacokinetics under Actions and Precautions). For prophylaxis of P.falciparum malaria in patients with severe renal impairment see Contraindications.
Dosage in Hepatic Impairment (Prophylaxis and Treatment): A pharmacokinetic study indicates that no dosage adjustments are needed in patients with mild to moderate hepatic impairment. No studies have been conducted in patients with severe hepatic impairment (see Pharmacology: Pharmacokinetics under Actions).
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