Mycamine

Mycamine

micafungin

Manufacturer:

Astellas Pharma

Distributor:

DKSH
Full Prescribing Info
Contents
Micafungin sodium.
Description
MYCAMINE 50 mg is a white coloured powder for injection containing 50.86 mg micafungin sodium, corresponding to 50 mg micafungin.
Active ingredient: Micafungin sodium.
Chemical name: Sodium 5-[(1S,2S)-2-[(3S,6S,9S,11R,15S,18S,20R,21R,24S,25S,26S)-3-[(R)-2-carbamoyl-1-hydroxyethyl]-11,20,21,25-tetrahydroxy-15-[(R)-1-hydroxyethyl]-26-methyl-2,5,8,14,17,23-hexaoxo-18-[4-[5-(4-pentyloxyphenyl)-isoxazol-3-yl]benzoylamino]-1,4,7,13,16,22-hexaazatricyclo-[22.3.0.09,13]heptacos-6-yl]-1,2-dihydroxyethyl]-2-hydroxyphenyl sulfate.
Molecular formula: C56H70N9NaO23S.
MYCAMINE is a sterile, white, powder for injection containing the active ingredient micafungin as the sodium salt. Micafungin sodium is a light sensitive, hygroscopic, amorphous, white powder that is freely soluble in water, isotonic sodium chloride solution, N,N-dimethylformamide and dimethylsulfoxide, slightly soluble in methyl alcohol, and practically insoluble in acetonitrile, ethyl alcohol (95%), acetone, diethyl ether and n-hexane.
MYCAMINE must be diluted with either sodium chloride 0.9% or glucose 5% solution prior to use (see DOSAGE & ADMINISTRATION).
Excipients/Inactive Ingredients: lactose, anhydrous citric acid, sodium hydroxide.
Action
Pharmacology: Micafungin, the active ingredient of MYCAMINE, is a member of the echinocandin lipopeptide family and inhibits non-competitively the synthesis of 1,3-β-D-glucan, an essential component of fungal cell walls which is not present in mammalian cells.
Clinical Trials: Candidaemia and Invasive Candidiasis: Micafungin (100 mg/day or 2 mg/kg/day) was as effective as and better tolerated than liposomal amphotericin B (3 mg/kg) as first-line treatment of candidaemia and invasive candidiasis in a randomised, double-blind, multinational non-inferiority study. Micafungin and liposomal amphotericin B were received for a median duration of 15 days (range 4 to 42 days in adults and 12 to 42 days in children).
Non-inferiority was proven for adult patients, and similar findings were demonstrated for the paediatric subpopulations (including neonates and premature infants). Efficacy findings were consistent, independent of the infective Candida species, primary site of infection and neutropenic status (see Table 1). Micafungin demonstrated a smaller mean peak decrease in estimated glomerular filtration rate during treatment (p < 0.001) and a lower incidence of infusion-related reactions (p = 0.001) than liposomal amphotericin B.
MYCAMINE has not been adequately studied in patients with endocarditis, osteomyelitis and meningitis due to Candida infections. (See Table 1.)

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Oesophageal Candidiasis: In a randomised, double-blind study of micafungin versus fluconazole in the first-line treatment of oesophageal candidiasis, 518 patients received at least a single dose of study drug. The median treatment duration was 14 days and the median average daily dose was 150 mg for micafungin (N = 260) and 200 mg for fluconazole (N = 258). Most patients in this study had HIV infection. An endoscopic grade of 0 (endoscopic cure) at the end of treatment was observed for 87.7% (228/260) and 88.0% (227/258) of patients in the micafungin and fluconazole groups, respectively (95% CI for difference: [-5.9%, 5.3%]). The lower limit of the 95% CI was above the predefined non-inferiority margin of -10%, proving non-inferiority. The odds of endoscopic cure was approximately 2.6 times higher in HIV patients with a baseline CD4 count ≥100 than in HIV patients with a baseline CD4 count <100. All efficacy findings were consistent and showed micafungin to be as effective as fluconazole in adult oesophageal candidiasis patients, with similar rates of endoscopic cure, clinical resolution of the infection, mycological eradication, dynamics or improvement and incidence of relapse. The nature and incidence of adverse events were also similar between treatment groups.
Prophylaxis of Invasive Fungal Infection: Micafungin was more effective than fluconazole in preventing invasive fungal infections in a population of patients at high risk of developing a systemic fungal infection (patients undergoing haematopoietic stem cell transplantation [HSCT] in a randomised, double-blind, multicentre study). Treatment success was defined as the absence of a proven, probable, or suspected systemic fungal infection through the end of therapy and absence of a proven or probable systemic fungal infection through the end of study. Most patients (97%, N = 882) had neutropenia at baseline (< 200 neutrophils/μL) and neutropenia persisted for a median of 13 days. There was a fixed daily dose of 50 mg (1.0 mg/kg) for micafungin and 400 mg (8 mg/kg) for fluconazole. The mean period of treatment was 19 days for micafungin and 18 days for fluconazole in the adult population (N = 798) and 23 days for both treatment arms in the paediatric population (N = 84). Table 2 summarises the main efficacy findings. (See Table 2.)

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The rate of treatment success was statistically significantly higher for micafungin than fluconazole (1.6% versus 2.4% breakthrough infections). Breakthrough Aspergillus infections were observed in 1 versus 7 patients, and proven or probable breakthrough Candida infections were observed in 4 versus 2 patients in the micafungin and fluconazole groups, respectively. Other breakthrough infections were caused by Fusarium (1 and 2 patients, respectively) and Zygomycetes (1 and 0 patients, respectively). The nature and incidence of adverse reactions were similar between treatment groups.
Pharmacokinetics: Absorption: The pharmacokinetics of micafungin have been evaluated in healthy subjects, haematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients and patients with invasive and oesophageal candidiasis up to a maximum dose of 8mg/kg. There is no evidence of systemic accumulation with repeated administration and increases in systemic exposure (AUC and Cmax) are proportional to increases in dose. Steady-state is generally reached by Day 4.
Distribution: Following intravenous administration, concentrations of micafungin show a bi-exponential decline as the drug is rapidly distributed into tissues. Micafungin is highly protein bound (>99%), primarily to albumin and to a lesser extent to alpha-1-acid glycoprotein. Binding to albumin is independent of micafungin concentration (10 to 100 μg/mL). Micafungin does not displace albumin-bound bilirubin at clinically relevant concentrations.
In an in vitro study in which 14C-micafungin was added to whole human blood, the blood to plasma ratio was approximately 0.85 and was independent of concentration over the range of 0.1 to 10 μg/mL micafungin.
The volume of distribution of micafungin at terminal phase was 0.24 to 0.41 L/kg body weight.
Metabolism: Unchanged micafungin is the principal circulating compound in the systemic circulation. Metabolism takes place in the liver where micafungin is metabolised to M1 (catechol form) by arylsulfatase, with further metabolism to M2 (methoxy form) by catechol-O- methyltransferase. M5 is formed by hydroxylation at the side chain (ω-1 position) of micafungin catalysed by cytochrome P450 (CYP) isoenzymes. Exposure to these metabolites is generally low and they are not expected to contribute to the overall efficacy of micafungin. Although micafungin is a substrate for CYP3A in vitro, hydroxylation by CYP3A is not a major pathway for metabolism in vivo.
Excretion: The mean terminal half-life of micafungin is approximately 10 to 17 hours and stays consistent across doses up to 8mg/kg after single and repeated administration in patients and healthy volunteers. Faecal excretion is the major route of elimination. Following a single intravenous dose of 14C-micafungin (25 mg) to healthy volunteers, 11.6% of the radioactivity was recovered in the urine and 71.0% in the faeces over 28 days.
Pharmacokinetic characteristics in special populations: Patients with hepatic impairment: A single 1-hour infusion of 100 mg micafungin was administered to eight subjects with moderate hepatic impairment (Child-Pugh score 7 to 9) and eight age, gender and weight matched subjects with normal hepatic function. The pharmacokinetics of micafungin did not differ significantly from those in healthy subjects.
A single 1-hour infusion of 100mg micafungin was administered to eight subjects with severe hepatic impairment (Child-Pugh score 10 to 12) and eight age, gender, ethnic and weight matched subjects with normal hepatic function. The Cmax and AUC values of micafungin were lower by approximately 30% in subjects with severe hepatic impairment compared to normal subjects. The Cmax and AUC values of M5 metabolite were approximately 2.3-fold higher in subjects with severe hepatic impairment compared to normal subjects. However, this exposure (parent and metabolite) was comparable to that in patients with systemic Candida infection. Therefore, no micafungin dose adjustment is necessary in patients with mild to severe hepatic impairment.
Patients with renal impairment: A single 1-hour infusion of 100 mg micafungin was administered to nine subjects with severe renal impairment (creatinine clearance < 30 mL/min) and to nine subjects with normal renal function (creatinine clearance > 80 mL/min) who were age, gender and weight matched. The Cmax and AUC were not significantly altered by severe renal impairment. No dose adjustment is necessary for patients with renal impairment.
Elderly: A single 1-hour infusion of 50 mg micafungin was administered to ten healthy subjects aged 66 to 78 years and ten healthy subjects aged 20 to 24 years. The pharmacokinetics of micafungin showed a similar time-course profile in both the elderly and young, and there were no significant differences in the pharmacokinetic parameters. No dose adjustment is necessary for the elderly.
Paediatric use: In paediatric patients, micafungin exposure is dose proportional in the dose range of 0.5-4 mg/kg, and up to 10 mg/kg in infants less than 4 months of age. Clearance is influenced by weight, with mean values of weight-adjusted clearance 1.35 times higher in the younger children (4 months to 5 years) and 1.14 times higher in children aged 6 to 11 years. Older children (12-16 years) had mean clearance values similar to those determined in adult patients. Mean weight-adjusted clearance in infants less than 4 months of age is approximately 2.6-fold greater than older children (12-16 years) and 2.3-fold greater than in adults. Weight-adjusted clearance differences support weight-based dosing up to body weights within the range of 40 (treatment) to 50 kg (prophylaxis), above which adult dosing is recommended.
Micafungin dosed at 4 mg/kg in infants less than 4 months approximates drug exposures achieved in adults receiving 100 mg/day for the treatment of invasive candidiasis. Higher doses (e.g., 10 mg/kg) may be required to treat CNS infection in infants less than 4 months of age as demonstrated by a PK-PD bridging study that showed dose-dependent penetration of micafungin into the CNS to achieve maximum eradication of fungal burden in the CNS tissues. Population PK modeling demonstrated that a dose of 10 mg/kg in infants less than 4 months of age would be sufficient to achieve the target exposure for the treatment of CNS Candida infections.
Gender and race: Gender or race (Caucasian, Black, Oriental) did not significantly influence the pharmacokinetic parameters of micafungin. No dose adjustment is required based on gender or race.
Microbiology: Micafungin exhibits fungicidal activity against most Candida species and prominently inhibits actively growing hyphae of Aspergillus species.
In vitro
activity: Susceptibility testing was performed with modifications according to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) methods M27-A2 (Candida species) and M38-A (Aspergillus species).
Micafungin displayed inhibitory activity against clinically relevant Candida species. The Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) rank order was: C. albicans (including azole resistant strains) C. tropicalis, C. glabrata, C. krusei, C. parapsilosis, C. gulliermondii.
Micafungin displayed inhibitory activity against clinically relevant Aspergillus species (A. fumigatus, A. niger, A. flavus, A. nidulans, A. terreus and A. versicolor).
Micafungin has virtually no activity against Cryptococcus neoformans, Trichosporon cutaneum, Trichosporon asahii, Fusarium solani, Pseudallescheria boydii, Absidia corymbifera, Cunninghamella elegans, Rhizopus oryzae or Rhizopus microsporus.
In vivo activity: Micafungin was effective in the treatment of disseminated candidiasis, as well as against oropharyngeal and oesophageal candidiasis.
Resistance induction: As for all antimicrobial agents, cases of reduced susceptibility and resistance have been reported and cross-resistance with other echinocandins cannot be excluded. Reduced susceptibility to echinocandins has been associated with mutations in the Fks1 gene coding for a major subunit of glucan synthase.
Indications/Uses
MYCAMINE is indicated for: Treatment of invasive candidiasis in children and adults.
Treatment of oesophageal candidiasis in adults, adolescents ≥16 years of age and the elderly patients for whom intravenous therapy is appropriate.
Prophylaxis of Candida infection in children and adult patients undergoing allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation or patients who are expected to have neutropenia (absolute neutrophil count < 500 cells/μL) for 10 or more days.
Dosage/Direction for Use
MYCAMINE should be administered once daily by intravenous infusion. The dosage depends on the indication and body weight of the patient as shown in Tables 3 and 4 as follows. (See Table 3.)

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Treatment duration: Invasive candidiasis: The treatment duration of Candida infection should be a minimum of 14 days. The antifungal treatment should continue for at least one week after two sequential negative blood cultures have been obtained and after resolution of clinical signs and symptoms of infection.
Oesophageal candidiasis: For the treatment of oesophageal candidiasis, MYCAMINE should be administered for at least one week after resolution of clinical signs and symptoms.
Prophylaxis of Candida infections: For prophylaxis of Candida infection, MYCAMINE should be administered for at least one week after neutrophil recovery. (See Tables 4 and 5.)

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Treatment duration: Invasive candidiasis: The treatment duration of Candida infection should be a minimum of 14 days and should continue for at least one week after two sequential negative blood cultures have been obtained and after resolution of clinical signs and symptoms of infection.
Prophylaxis of Candida infections: For prophylaxis of Candida infection, MYCAMINE should be administered for at least one week after neutrophil recovery. Experience in patients less than two years of age is limited.
Patients with hepatic impairment: No dosage adjustment is required in patients with mild to severe hepatic impairment (see PHARMACOLOGY: Pharmacokinetics: Pharmacokinetic characteristics in special populations under Actions).
Patients with renal impairment: No dosage adjustment is required in patients with renal impairment (creatinine clearance <30mL/min) (see PHARMACOLOGY: Pharmacokinetics: Pharmacokinetic characteristics in special populations under Actions).
Instructions for reconstitution and dilution: MYCAMINE must not be mixed or co-infused with any other medicinal products except those mentioned as follows. MYCAMINE has been shown to precipitate when mixed directly with a number of other commonly used medications.
Using aseptic techniques at room temperature, MYCAMINE should be reconstituted and diluted as follows: Remove the plastic cap from the vial and disinfect the stopper with alcohol.
Five mL of sodium chloride 9 mg/mL (0.9%) solution for infusion or glucose 50 mg/mL (5%) solution for infusion (taken from a 100 mL bag/bottle) should be aseptically and slowly injected into each vial along the side of the inner wall. Although the concentrate will foam, every effort should be made to minimise the amount of foam generated. A sufficient number of vials of MYCAMINE should be reconstituted to obtain the required dose as shown in Table 6 as follows.
The vial should be rotated gently. Do not shake. The powder will dissolve completely. The concentrate should be used immediately for further dilution. The product is for single use in one patient only. Discard any residue.
All of the reconstituted concentrate should be withdrawn from each vial and returned into the infusion bag/bottle from which it was originally taken. The diluted infusion solution should be used immediately.
The infusion bag/bottle should be gently inverted to disperse the diluted solution but NOT agitated in order to avoid foaming. Do not use if the solution is cloudy or has precipitated.
The infusion bag/bottle containing the diluted infusion solution should be inserted into a closable opaque bag for protection from light. (See Table 6.)

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Administration: An existing intravenous line should be flushed with sodium chloride 0.9% solution prior to infusion. Administer the reconstituted and diluted MYCAMINE solution intravenously over approximately one hour.
Overdosage
Repeated daily doses up to 8 mg/kg (maximum total dose 896 mg) in adult patients have been administered in clinical trials with no reported dose-limiting toxicity. In one spontaneous case, it was reported a dosage of 16 mg/kg/day was administered in a newborn patient. No adverse reactions associated with this high dose were noted. There is no experience with overdoses of micafungin. In case of overdose, general supportive measures and symptomatic treatment should be administered. Micafungin is highly protein bound and is therefore not dialysable.
Contraindications
MYCAMINE is contraindicated in patients with hypersensitivity to any component of this medication or to other echinocandins (see DESCRIPTION).
Special Precautions
Hypersensitivity: During administration of micafungin, anaphylactic/anaphylactoid reactions including shock may occur. If these reactions occur, MYCAMINE should be discontinued and appropriate treatment administered.
Skin and Subcutaneous Tissue Disorders: Exfoliative cutaneous reactions, such as Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis have been reported. If patients develop a rash they should be monitored closely and MYCAMINE discontinued if lesions progress.
Haemolysis: Isolated cases of haemolysis including acute intravascular haemolysis or haemolytic anaemia have been reported in patients treated with micafungin. Patients who develop clinical or laboratory evidence of haemolysis during MYCAMINE therapy should be monitored closely for evidence of worsening of these conditions and evaluated for the risk/benefit of continuing therapy.
Hepatic effects: Liver function should be carefully monitored during MYCAMINE treatment. Early discontinuation in the presence of significant and persistent elevation of ALT/AST is recommended. MYCAMINE treatment should be conducted on a careful risk/benefit basis, particularly in patients having severe liver function impairment or chronic liver diseases known to represent preneoplastic conditions, such as advanced liver fibrosis, cirrhosis, viral hepatitis, neonatal liver disease or congenital enzyme defects, or receiving a concomitant therapy including hepatotoxic and/or genotoxic properties.
MYCAMINE should only be prescribed after careful benefit-risk assessment and, in particular, taking into consideration the potential risk of liver tumours.
Effects on fertility: Micafungin had no effect on the fertility of male and female rats at doses up to 32 mg/kg/day IV (4-fold the anticipated maximum clinical exposure, based on AUC). However, male rats treated for 9 weeks at 10-32 mg/kg/day IV micafungin (resulting in 1-4-fold the anticipated maximum clinical exposure, based on AUC) showed vacuolation of the epididymal ductal epithelial cells. A dose of 32 mg/kg/day also resulted in higher epididymis weights and reduced numbers of sperm cells. In a 39 week IV study in dogs, seminiferous tubular atrophy and decreased sperm in the epididymis were also observed at 10 and 32 mg/kg/day IV micafungin (resulting in 1-5-fold the anticipated maximum clinical exposure, based on AUC).
Testicular toxicity was observed in two animal species. Although the clinical relevance is unknown, micafungin may have the potential to affect male fertility in humans.
Genotoxicity: Micafungin was not genotoxic nor clastogenic in a standard battery of genotoxicity tests. Micafungin did not induce gene mutations in bacterial assays and did not induce chromosomal aberrations in Chinese Hamster Lung cells in vitro. There was no indication of an induction of micronuclei by micafungin in a micronucleus test in mice or unscheduled DNA synthesis in rat hepatocytes.
Carcinogenicity: No standard carcinogenicity studies have been conducted with micafungin.
Hepatic carcinomas and adenomas were observed in 3 to 6 month repeat dose IV toxicity studies in rats at 32 mg/kg/day (resulting in 4-fold the maximum anticipated clinical exposure, based on AUC) with 12 to 20 month recovery periods. In shorter term studies, altered hepatocellular foci, which were likely precursors to the hepatic tumours, were observed. Exposure at the no observed adverse effect level for altered hepatocellular foci resulted in exposures similar to the maximum anticipated clinically, based on AUC.
It is not known whether the hepatic neoplasms observed in treated rats also occur in other species, or if there is a dose threshold for this effect. The relevance of the hepatocarcinogenic potential of micafungin in humans is unknown.
Effect on laboratory tests: There is no information on the effect of micafungin on laboratory tests.
Use in Pregnancy (Category B31): There are no adequate and well-controlled studies of micafungin in pregnant women.
Micafungin and/or its metabolites were shown to cross the placental barrier and distribute to the foetus in rats. No effects on embryo foetal development were observed in rats given IV doses of micafungin up to 32 mg/kg/day throughout organogenesis (2-3-fold the anticipated maximum clinical exposure, based on AUC). However, treatment of rabbits at doses of 32 mg/kg/day IV (2-fold the maximum anticipated clinical exposure, based on AUC) throughout organogenesis was associated with visceral abnormalities and increased abortion. Visceral abnormalities included abnormal lobation of the lung, levocardia, retrocaval ureter, anomalous right subclavian artery, and dilation of the ureter.
While animal studies are not always predictive of a human response, MYCAMINE should only be used during pregnancy if the potential benefit justifies the potential risk to the foetus.
1 Drugs which have been taken by only a limited number of pregnant women and women of childbearing age, without an increase in the frequency of malformation or other direct or indirect harmful effects on the human foetus having been observed. Studies in animals have shown evidence of an increased occurrence of foetal damage, the significance of which is considered uncertain in humans.
Use in Lactation: Micafungin and its metabolites were excreted in the milk of lactating rats. In a pre- and postnatal development study in rats, doses of 32 mg/kg/day IV micafungin (resulting in 2-3-fold the anticipated maximum clinical exposure, based on AUC) were associated with reduced pup birth weights and a possible delay in the time of eyelid opening and balanopreputia cleavage.
It is not known whether micafungin is excreted in human breast milk. Therefore caution should be exercised when MYCAMINE is administered during breastfeeding.
Use in Children: The incidence of some adverse reactions was higher in paediatric patients than in adult patients (see ADVERSE REACTIONS).
Use in Elderly: No dosage adjustment is necessary for the elderly (see PHARMACOLOGY: Pharmacokinetics: Pharmacokinetic characteristics in special populations under Actions).
Use In Pregnancy & Lactation
Use in Pregnancy (Category B31): There are no adequate and well-controlled studies of micafungin in pregnant women.
Micafungin and/or its metabolites were shown to cross the placental barrier and distribute to the foetus in rats. No effects on embryo foetal development were observed in rats given IV doses of micafungin up to 32 mg/kg/day throughout organogenesis (2-3-fold the anticipated maximum clinical exposure, based on AUC). However, treatment of rabbits at doses of 32 mg/kg/day IV (2-fold the maximum anticipated clinical exposure, based on AUC) throughout organogenesis was associated with visceral abnormalities and increased abortion. Visceral abnormalities included abnormal lobation of the lung, levocardia, retrocaval ureter, anomalous right subclavian artery, and dilation of the ureter.
While animal studies are not always predictive of a human response, MYCAMINE should only be used during pregnancy if the potential benefit justifies the potential risk to the foetus.
1 Drugs which have been taken by only a limited number of pregnant women and women of childbearing age, without an increase in the frequency of malformation or other direct or indirect harmful effects on the human foetus having been observed. Studies in animals have shown evidence of an increased occurrence of foetal damage, the significance of which is considered uncertain in humans.
Use in Lactation: Micafungin and its metabolites were excreted in the milk of lactating rats. In a pre- and postnatal development study in rats, doses of 32 mg/kg/day IV micafungin (resulting in 2-3-fold the anticipated maximum clinical exposure, based on AUC) were associated with reduced pup birth weights and a possible delay in the time of eyelid opening and balanopreputia cleavage.
It is not known whether micafungin is excreted in human breast milk. Therefore caution should be exercised when MYCAMINE is administered during breastfeeding.
Adverse Reactions
Overall MYCAMINE Safety Experience in Clinical Trials: The overall safety of MYCAMINE was assessed in 3083 patients and 501 volunteers in 41 clinical studies, including the invasive candidiasis, esophageal candidiasis and prophylaxis studies, who received single or multiple doses of MYCAMINE, ranging from 12.5 mg to ≥150 mg/day. Treatment emergent adverse events which occurred in ≥ 5% of all patients who received MYCAMINE in these trials are shown in Table 7.
Overall, 2810 of 3083 (91.1%) patients who received MYCAMINE experienced an adverse event.
Clinically significant adverse events regardless of causality or incidence which occurred in these trials are listed as follows: Blood and lymphatic system disorders: coagulopathy, febrile neutropenia, haemolysis, haemolytic anemia, pancytopenia, thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura.
Cardiac disorders: arrhythmia, atrial fibrillation, cardiac arrest, cyanosis, hypotension, myocardial infarction, tachycardia.
Gastrointestinal disorders: abdominal pain upper, dyspepsia.
General disorders and administration site conditions: injection site thrombosis.
Hepatobiliary disorders: hepatocellular damage, hepatomegaly, jaundice, hepatic failure.
Infections and infestations: infection, pneumonia, sepsis.
Metabolism and nutrition disorders: acidosis, anorexia, hyponatraemia.
Musculoskeletal, connective tissue and bone disorders: arthralgia.
Nervous system disorders: convulsions, encephalopathy, intracranial haemorrhage.
Psychiatric disorders: delirium.
Renal and urinary disorders: anuria, haemoglobinuria, oliguria, renal failure acute, renal tubular necrosis.
Respiratory, thoracic and mediastinal disorders: apnoea, dyspnoea, hypoxia, pulmonary embolism.
Skin and subcutaneous tissue disorders: erythema multiforme, skin necrosis, urticaria.
Vascular disorders: deep venous thrombosis, hypertension. (See Table 7.)

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Postmarketing Adverse Reactions: The following adverse reactions have been identified during the post-approval use of micafungin (as sodium) powder for injection. Because these reactions are reported voluntarily from a population of uncertain size, it is not always possible to reliably estimate their frequency. A causal relationship to micafungin (as sodium) powder for injection could not be excluded for these adverse reactions, which included: Blood and lymphatic system disorders: white blood cell count decreased, haemolytic anaemia, disseminated intravascular coagulation.
Hepatobiliary disorders: hyperbilirubinaemia, hepatic function abnormal, hepatic disorder, hepatocellular damage.
Immune system disorders: anaphylactic reaction, anaphylactic shock, anaphylactoid reaction, anaphylactoid shock.
Renal and urinary disorders: acute renal failure and renal impairment.
Skin and subcutaneous tissue disorders: Stevens-Johnson syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis.
Vascular disorders: shock.
Paediatric patients: The incidence of some adverse events (AEs) in the clinical study database (thrombocytopenia, tachycardia, hypertension, hypotension, hyperbilirubinaemia, hepatomegaly, renal failure acute, blood urea increased) was higher in paediatric patients than adult patients. Additionally, paediatric patients < 1 year of age experienced about two times more often an increase in ALT, AST and AP than older paediatric patients.
No clinically meaningful differences in the safety profile could be discerned by paediatric age strata of < 4 weeks, 4 weeks to < 1 year, 1 to 4 years, 5 to 8 years, 9 to 12 years and 13 to < 16 years.
Drug Interactions
Micafungin has a low potential for interactions with medicines metabolised via CYP3A mediated pathways as shown as follows.
Effects of other medicines on micafungin: A total of 14 drug-drug interaction studies were conducted in healthy volunteers to evaluate the potential for interaction between micafungin and mycophenolate mofetil, cyclosporin, tacrolimus, prednisolone, sirolimus, nifedipine, fluconazole, ritonavir, rifampicin, itraconazole, voriconazole and amphotericin B. In these studies, no interaction that altered the pharmacokinetics of micafungin was observed. Therefore, no MYCAMINE dose adjustments are necessary when these medicines are administered concomitantly.
Effects of micafungin on other medicines: There was no effect of a single dose or multiple doses of micafungin on mycophenolate mofetil, cyclosporin, tacrolimus, prednisolone, fluconazole and voriconazole pharmacokinetics.
Sirolimus AUC was increased by 21% with no effect on Cmax in the presence of steady-state micafungin compared with sirolimus alone. Nifedipine AUC and Cmax were increased by 18% and 42% respectively, in the presence of steady-state micafungin compared with nifedipine alone. Itraconazole AUC and Cmax were increased by 22% and 11% respectively. Therefore, patients receiving sirolimus, nifedipine or itraconazole in combination with MYCAMINE should be monitored for toxicity and the dosage of sirolimus, nifedipine or itraconazole reduced if necessary.
Storage
Unopened vial: Store below 30°C. Protect from light.
Reconstituted concentrate in vial: Chemical and physical in-use stability has been demonstrated for up to 24 hours after preparation at 30°C when reconstituted with sodium chloride 0.9% or glucose 5% solution.
Diluted infusion solution: Chemical and physical in-use stability has been demonstrated for up to 6 hours after preparation in a transfusion bag without light protection at 30°C when reconstituted with sodium chloride 0.9% or glucose 5% solution. Chemical and physical in-use stability has been demonstrated for up to 24 hours after preparation in a transfusion bag with light protection at 30°C when reconstituted with sodium chloride 0.9% or glucose 5% solution.
MYCAMINE contains no preservatives. Microbiological in-use stability has been demonstrated for up to 24 hours after preparation in a transfusion bag at 30°C when reconstituted with sodium chloride 0.9% or glucose 5% solution.
MIMS Class
ATC Classification
J02AX05 - micafungin ; Belongs to the class of other systemic antimycotics.
Presentation/Packing
Powd for soln for infusion 50 mg (single-use vial) x 1's, 10's.
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