Nexium/Nexium MUPS

Nexium/Nexium MUPS Mechanism of Action

esomeprazole

Manufacturer:

AstraZeneca

Distributor:

Zuellig Pharma
Full Prescribing Info
Action
Pharmacotherapeutic Group: Proton pump inhibitor. ATC Code: A02B C05.
Pharmacology: Pharmacodynamics: Esomeprazole is the S-isomer of omeprazole and reduces gastric acid secretion through a specific targeted mechanism of action. It is a specific inhibitor of the acid pump in the parietal cell. Both the R- and S-isomer of omeprazole have similar pharmacodynamic activity.
Site and mechanism of action: Esomeprazole is a weak base and is concentrated and converted to the active form in the highly acidic environment of the secretory canaliculi of the parietal cell, where it inhibits the enzyme H+K+-ATPase - the acid pump and inhibits both basal and stimulated acid secretion.
Effects on gastric acid secretion: Nexium: After 5 days of oral dosing with 20 mg and 40 mg of esomeprazole, intragastric pH above 4 was maintained for a mean time of 13 hours and 17 hours, respectively over 24 hours in symptomatic GERD patients. The effect is similar irrespective of whether esomeprazole is administered orally or intravenously.
Using AUC as a surrogate parameter for plasma concentration, a relationship between inhibition of acid secretion and exposure has been shown after oral administration of esomeprazole.
During intravenous administration of 80 mg esomeprazole as a bolus infusion over 30 minutes followed by a continuous intravenous infusion of 8 mg/h for 23.5 hours, intragastric pH above 4, and pH above 6 was maintained for a mean time of 21 hours, and 11-13 hours, respectively, over 24 hours in healthy subjects.
Nexium MUPS: After oral dosing with esomeprazole 20 mg and 40 mg the onset of effect occurs within one hour. After repeated administration with 20 mg esomeprazole once daily for five days, mean peak acid output after pentagastrin stimulation is decreased 90% when measured 6 - 7 hours after dosing on day five.
After five days of oral dosing with 20 mg and 40 mg of esomeprazole, intragastric pH above 4 was maintained for a mean time of 13 hours and 17 hours, respectively over 24 hours in symptomatic GERD patients. The proportion of patients maintaining an intragastric pH above 4 for at least 8, 12 and 16 hours respectively were for esomeprazole 20 mg 76%, 54% and 24%. Corresponding proportions for esomeprazole 40 mg were 97%, 92% and 56%.
Using AUC as a surrogate parameter for plasma concentration, a relationship between inhibition of acid secretion and exposure has been shown.
Therapeutic effects of acid inhibition: Healing of reflux esophagitis with esomeprazole 40 mg occurs in approximately 78% of patients after four weeks, and in 93% after eight weeks of oral treatment.
In a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled clinical study, patients with endoscopically confirmed peptic ulcer bleeding characterised as Forrest Ia, Ib, IIa or IIb (9%, 43%, 38% and 10 % respectively) were randomized to receive Nexium solution for infusion (n=375) or placebo (n=389). Following endoscopic haemostasis, patients received either 80 mg esomeprazole as an intravenous infusion over 30 minutes followed by a continuous infusion of 8 mg per hour or placebo for 72 hours. After the initial 72-hour period, all patients received open-label 40 mg oral Nexium for 27 days for acid suppression. The occurrence of rebleeding within 3 days was 5.9% in the Nexium treated group compared to 10.3% for the placebo group. At 30 days post-treatment, the occurrence of rebleeding in the Nexium treated versus the placebo treated group 7.7% vs 13.6%.
Nexium MUPS: One week treatment with esomeprazole 20 mg b.i.d. and appropriate antibiotics, results in successful eradication of Helicobacter pylori in approximately 90% of patients. After eradication treatment for one week there is no need for subsequent monotherapy with antisecretory drugs for effective ulcer healing and symptom resolution in uncomplicated duodenal ulcers.
Other effects related to acid inhibition: During treatment with antisecretory medicinal products serum gastrin increases in response to the decreased acid secretion. Also CgA increases due to decreased gastric acidity. The increased CgA level may interfere with investigations for neuroendocrine tumours. Literature reports indicate that proton pump inhibitor treatment should be stopped 5 to 14 days before CgA measurement. Measurements should be repeated if levels have not normalised by this time.
An increased number of ECL cells possibly related to the increased serum gastrin levels, have been observed in both children and adults during long term treatment with orally administered esomeprazole. The findings are considered to be of no clinical significance.
During long-term oral treatment with antisecretory drugs gastric glandular cysts have been reported to occur at a somewhat increased frequency. These changes are a physiological consequence of pronounced inhibition of acid secretion, are benign and appear to be reversible.
Decreased gastric acidity due to any means including proton pump inhibitors, increases gastric counts of bacteria normally present in the gastrointestinal tract. Treatment with proton pump inhibitors may lead to slightly increased risk of gastrointestinal infections such as Salmonella and Campylobacter and, in hospitalised patients, possibly also Clostridium difficile.
Nexium MUPS: In two studies with ranitidine as an active comparator, Nexium showed better effect in healing of gastric ulcers in patients using NSAIDs, including COX-2 selective NSAIDs.
In two studies with placebo as comparator, Nexium showed better effect in the prevention of gastric and duodenal ulcers in patients using NSAIDs (aged >60 and/or with previous ulcer), including COX-2 selective NSAIDs.
Pharmacokinetics: Nexium: Distribution: The apparent volume of distribution at steady state in healthy subjects is approximately 0.22 l/kg body weight. Esomeprazole is 97% plasma protein bound.
Metabolism and excretion: Esomeprazole is completely metabolised by the cytochrome P450 system (CYP). The major part of the metabolism of esomeprazole is dependent on the polymorphic CYP2C19, responsible for the formation of the hydroxy- and desmethyl metabolites of esomeprazole. The remaining part is dependent on another specific isoform, CYP3A4, responsible for the formation of esomeprazole sulphone, the main metabolite in plasma.
The parameters below reflect mainly the pharmacokinetics in individuals with a functional CYP2C19 enzyme, extensive metabolisers.
Total plasma clearance is about 17 l/h after a single dose and about 9 l/h after repeated administration. The plasma elimination half-life is about 1.3 hours after repeated once-daily dosing. Total exposure (AUC) increases with repeated administration of esomeprazole. This increase is dose-dependent and results in a non-linear dose-AUC relationship after repeated administration. This time- and dose-dependency is due to a decrease of first pass metabolism and systemic clearance probably caused by inhibition of the CYP2C19 enzyme by esomeprazole and/or its sulphone metabolite.
Esomeprazole is completely eliminated from plasma between doses with no tendency for accumulation during once-daily administration.
Following repeated doses of 40 mg administered as intravenous injections, the mean peak plasma concentration is approx. 13.6 micromol/l. The mean peak plasma concentration after corresponding oral doses is approx. 4.6 micromol/l. A smaller increase (of approx. 30%) can be seen in the total exposure after intravenous administration compared to oral administration.
There is a dose-linear increase in total exposure following intravenous administration of esomeprazole as a 30-minute infusion (40 mg, 80 mg or 120 mg) followed by a continuous infusion (4 mg/h or 8 mg/h) over 23.5 hours.
The major metabolites of esomeprazole have no effect on gastric acid secretion. Almost 80% of an oral dose of esomeprazole is excreted as metabolites in the urine, the remainder in the faeces. Less than 1% of the parent drug is found in urine.
Special patient populations: Approximately 2.9±1.5% of the population lacks a functional CYP2C19 enzyme and is called poor metabolisers. In these individuals the metabolism of esomeprazole is probably mainly catalysed by CYP3A4. After repeated once-daily administration of 40 mg oral esomeprazole, the mean total exposure was approximately 100% higher in poor metabolisers than in subjects with a functional CYP2C19 enzyme (extensive metabolisers). Mean peak plasma concentrations were increased by about 60%. Similar differences have been seen for intravenous administration of esomeprazole. These findings have no implications for the posology of esomeprazole.
The metabolism of esomeprazole is not significantly changed in elderly subjects (71-80 years of age).
Following a single oral dose of 40 mg esomeprazole the mean total exposure is approximately 30% higher in females than in males. No gender difference is seen after repeated once-daily administration. Similar differences have been observed for intravenous administration of esomeprazole. These findings have no implications for the posology of esomeprazole.
The metabolism of esomeprazole in patients with mild to moderate liver dysfunction may be impaired. The metabolic rate is decreased in patients with severe liver dysfunction resulting in a doubling of the total exposure of esomeprazole. Therefore, a maximum dose of 20 mg should not be exceeded in GERD patients with severe dysfunction. For patients with bleeding ulcers and severe liver impairment, following an initial bolus dose of 80 mg, a maximum continuous intravenous infusion dose of 4 mg/h for 71.5 hours may be sufficient. Esomeprazole or its major metabolites do not show any tendency to accumulate with once daily dosing.
No studies have been performed in patients with decreased renal function. Since the kidney is responsible for the excretion of the metabolites of esomeprazole but not for the elimination of the parent compound, the metabolism of esomeprazole is not expected to be changed in patients with impaired renal function.
Nexium MUPS: Absorption and distribution: Esomeprazole is acid labile and is administered orally as enteric-coated granules. In vivo conversion to the R-isomer is negligible. Absorption of esomeprazole is rapid, with peak plasma levels occurring approximately 1-2 hours after dose. The absolute bioavailability is 64% after a single dose of 40 mg and increases to 89% after repeated once-daily administration. For 20 mg esomeprazole the corresponding values are 50% and 68%, respectively. The apparent volume of distribution at steady state in healthy subjects is approximately 0.22 L/kg body weight. Esomeprazole is 97% plasma protein bound.
Food intake both delays and decreases the absorption of esomeprazole although this has no significant influence on the effect of esomeprazole on intragastric acidity.
Metabolism and excretion: Esomeprazole is completely metabolised by the cytochrome P450 system (CYP). The major part of the metabolism of esomeprazole is dependent on the polymorphic CYP2C19, responsible for the formation of the hydroxy- and desmethyl metabolites of esomeprazole. The remaining part is dependent on another specific isoform, CYP3A4, responsible for the formation of esomeprazole sulphone, the main metabolite in plasma.
The parameters as follows reflect mainly the pharmacokinetics in individuals with a functional CYP2C19 enzyme, extensive metabolisers.
Total plasma clearance is about 17 L/h after a single dose and about 9 L/h after repeated administration. The plasma elimination half-life is about 1.3 hours after repeated once-daily dosing. The pharmacokinetics of esomeprazole has been studied in doses up to 40 mg b.i.d. The area under the plasma concentration-time curve increases with repeated administration of esomeprazole. This increase is dose-dependent and results in a more than dose proportional increase in AUC after repeated administration. This time- and dose-dependency is due to a decrease of first pass metabolism and systemic clearance probably caused by an inhibition of the CYP2C19 enzyme by esomeprazole and/or its sulphone metabolite. Esomeprazole is completely eliminated from plasma between doses with no tendency for accumulation during once-daily administration.
The major metabolites of esomeprazole have no effect on gastric acid secretion. Almost 80% of an oral dose of esomeprazole is excreted as metabolites in the urine, the remainder in the faeces. Less than 1% of the parent drug is found in urine.
Special patient populations: Approximately 2.9±1.5% of the population lack a functional CYP2C19 enzyme and are called poor metabolisers. In these individuals the metabolism of esomeprazole is probably mainly catalysed by CYP3A4. After repeated once-daily administration of 40 mg esomeprazole, the mean area under the plasma concentration-time curve was approximately 100% higher in poor metabolisers than in subjects having a functional CYP2C19 enzyme (extensive metabolisers). Mean peak plasma concentrations were increased by about 60%. These findings have no implications for the posology of esomeprazole.
The metabolism of esomeprazole is not significantly changed in elderly subjects (71-80 years of age).
Following a single dose of 40 mg esomeprazole the mean area under the plasma concentration time curve is approximately 30% higher in females than in males. No gender difference is seen after repeated once-daily administration. These findings have no implications for the posology of esomeprazole.
Impaired organ function: The metabolism of esomeprazole in patients with mild to moderate liver dysfunction may be impaired. The metabolic rate is decreased in patients with severe liver dysfunction resulting in a doubling of the area under the plasma concentration-time curve of esomeprazole. Therefore, a maximum of 20 mg should not be exceeded in patients with severe dysfunction. Esomeprazole or its major metabolites do not show any tendency to accumulate with once-daily dosing.
No studies have been performed in patients with decreased renal function. Since the kidney is responsible for the excretion of the metabolites of esomeprazole but not for the elimination of the parent compound, the metabolism of esomeprazole is not expected to be changed in patients with impaired renal function.
Adolescents 12-18 years: Following repeated dose administration of 20 mg and 40 mg esomeprazole, the total exposure (AUC) and the time to reach maximum plasma drug concentration (tmax) in 12 to 18-year-olds was similar to that in adults for both esomeprazole doses.
Toxicology: Preclinical Safety Data: Nexium: Preclinical studies reveal no particular hazard for humans, based on conventional studies of single and repeated dose toxicity, embryo-foetal toxicity and mutagenicity. Oral carcinogenicity studies in the rat with the racemic mixture have shown gastric ECL-cell hyperplasia and carcinoids. These gastric effects are the result of sustained, pronounced hypergastrinaemia secondary to reduced production of gastric acid, and are observed after long-term treatment in the rat with inhibitors of gastric acid secretion. In the non-clinical program for esomeprazole intravenous formulation there was no evidence of vaso-irritation but a slight tissue inflammatory reaction at the injection site after subcutaneous (paravenous) injection was noted. See Adverse Reactions.
Register or sign in to continue
Asia's one-stop resource for medical news, clinical reference and education
Sign up for free
Already a member? Sign in