Rexulti

Rexulti Adverse Reactions

brexpiprazole

Manufacturer:

Lundbeck

Distributor:

Zuellig Pharma
Full Prescribing Info
Adverse Reactions
Because clinical trials are conducted under widely varying conditions, adverse reaction rates observed in clinical trials of a drug cannot be directly compared to rates in the clinical trials of another drug and may not reflect the rates observed in clinical practice.
As with other drugs belonging to the therapeutic class of atypical antipsychotics, cases of restless legs syndrome and urinary retention have been reported for REXULTI.
Atypical antipsychotic drugs, such as REXULTI, have been associated with cases of sleep apnea, with or without concomitant weight gain. In patients who have a history of or are at risk for sleep apnea, REXULTI should be prescribed with caution.
CLINICAL TRIAL DATA FOR MAJOR DEPRESSIVE DISORDER: Table 6 shows the incidence of treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs) that occurred in at least 2% of patients treated with REXULTI and observed more frequently than with placebo. (See Table 6.)

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Adverse reactions that occurred <2% and the difference between REXULTI and placebo ≥0.5% in the short-term; placebo-controlled MDD adjunctive therapy clinical trials included palpitations, blepharospasm, toothache, salivary hypersecretion, urinary tract infection, blood prolactin increased, blood cortisol decreased, aspartate aminotransferase increased, muscle spasms, tension, night sweats and hypertension.
Selected Adverse Reactions: Extrapyramidal Symptoms: In the three 6-week, placebo-controlled, fixed-dose and one 6-week, placebo-controlled, flexible-dose MDD studies for REXULTI-treated patients, the incidence of reported EPS-related events, excluding akathisia events, was 5% versus 3% for placebo-treated patients. The incidence of akathisia events for REXULTI-treated patients was 8% versus 3% for placebo-treated patients.
Clinical Chemistry Findings: Weight Gain: In the long-term, placebo-controlled MDD study, the mean change in body weight from baseline at week 24 was 2.2 kg (N=349) for brexpiprazole and 0.8 kg (N=380) for placebo. The proportion of patients with a ≥ 7% increase in body weight was 19% (84/440) in the REXULTI group and 8.3% (36/436) in the placebo group and with a ≥ 7% decrease in body weight it was 1.4% (6/441) in the REXULTI group and 4.1% (18/436) in placebo. Weight increased led to discontinuation in 0.7% and 0.2% of patients in the REXULTI and placebo groups, respectively.
In the long-term, open-label MDD studies, the mean change in body weight from baseline to last visit was 2.6 kg (N=2232). The proportion of patients with a ≥7% increase in body weight at last visit was 22.12% (494/2232) and with a ≥7% decrease in body weight was 3.2% (72/2232). At 52 weeks, the proportion of patients with a ≥7% increase in body weight was 28.2 % (286/1013) and with a ≥7% decrease in body weight was 3.7% (37/1013). Weight gain led to discontinuation of study medication in 3.8% (84/2240) of patients.
Fasting Glucose: In the long-term, placebo-controlled MDD study, 7.1% of patients in the REXULTI group and 3.4% of patients in the placebo group had shifts from normal or impaired to high in fasting glucose. The mean change from baseline for fasting glucose to last visit was 1.74 mg/dL and 0.21 mg/dL for REXULTI and placebo, respectively.
In the long-term, open-label MDD studies, 5.22% of patients with normal baseline fasting glucose experienced a shift from normal to high while taking REXULTI, 24.35% of subjects with borderline fasting glucose experienced shifts from borderline to high. Combined, 9.06% of patients with normal or borderline fasting glucose experienced shifts to high fasting glucose during the long-term MDD studies. The mean change from baseline for fasting glucose to last visit in the long-term, open label trials was 3.53 [2.00] mg/dL.
Fasting Lipids: In the long-term, placebo-controlled study mean changes from baseline and shifts in lipids are presented in Table 7. (See Table 7.)

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In the long-term open-label studies, shifts in fasting cholesterol from normal to high were reported in 8.65% (total cholesterol), 3.20% (LDL cholesterol), and shifts from normal to low were reported in 13.30% (HDL cholesterol) of patients taking REXULTI. Of patients with normal baseline triglycerides, 17.26% experienced shifts to high, and 0.22% experienced shifts to very high triglycerides. Combined, 0.61% of patients with normal or borderline fasting triglycerides experienced shifts to very high fasting triglycerides during the long-term MDD studies. The mean changes from baseline for fasting HDL cholesterol, fasting LDL cholesterol, fasting cholesterol and fasting triglycerides to last visit in the longterm, open label trials were -2.13 [-2.00] mg/dL, 1.36 [1.00] mg/dL, 0.05 [0.00] mg/dL and 11.46 [8.00] mg/dL, respectively.
CLINICAL TRIAL DATA FOR SCHIZOPHRENIA: Table 8 shows the incidence of treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs) that occurred in at least 2% of patients treated with REXULTI and observed more frequently than placebo. (See Table 8.)

Click on icon to see table/diagram/image

Adverse reactions that occurred <2% and the difference between REXULTI and placebo ≥0.5% in the short-term; placebo-controlled schizophrenia clinical trials included abdominal pain upper, dental caries, flatulence, pain, blood pressure increased, blood triglycerides increased, pain in extremity, myalgia, sedation, cough and rash.
Extrapyramidal Symptoms: In the 6-week, placebo-controlled, fixed-dose schizophrenia studies for 2-4 mg REXULTI -treated patients, the incidence of reported EPS-related events, excluding akathisia events, was 12% versus 10% for placebo-treated patients. The incidence of akathisia events for REXULTI -treated patients was 6% versus 5% for placebo treated patients.
Clinical Chemistry Findings: Weight Gain: In the long-term, open-label schizophrenia studies, the mean change in body weight from baseline to last visit was 1.0 kg (N=1468). The proportion of patients with a ≥7% increase in body weight at any visit was 17.9% (226/1257) and with a ≥7% decrease in body weight at any visit was 8.2% (104/1257). Weight gain led to discontinuation of study medication in 0.4% (5/1265) of patients.
Fasting Glucose: In the long-term, open-label schizophrenia studies, 7% of patients with normal baseline fasting glucose experienced a shift from normal to high while taking brexpiprazole, 17% of subjects with borderline fasting glucose experienced shifts from borderline to high. Combined, 9% of patients with normal or borderline fasting glucose experienced shifts to high fasting glucose during the long-term schizophrenia studies. The mean change from baseline for fasting glucose to last visit in the long-term, open label trials was 2.35 [2.00] mg/dL.
Fasting Lipids: In the long-term open-label studies, shifts in baseline fasting cholesterol from normal to high were reported in 6% (total cholesterol), 3% (LDL cholesterol), and shifts in baseline from normal to low were reported in 20% (HDL cholesterol) of patients taking brexpiprazole. Of patients with normal baseline triglycerides, 14% experienced shifts to high, and 0.3% experienced shifts to very high triglycerides. Combined, 0.5% of patients with normal or borderline fasting triglycerides experienced shifts to very high fasting triglycerides during the long-term schizophrenia studies. The mean changes from baseline for fasting HDL cholesterol, fasting LDL cholesterol, fasting cholesterol and fasting triglycerides to last visit in the long-term, open label trials were 0.89 [1.00] mg/dL, -0.97 [-1.00] mg/dL, 0.05 [0.00] mg/dL and -0.40 [-2.00] mg/dL, respectively.
Additional Findings Observed in Schizophrenia Clinical Trials: The adverse reactions reported in a 52-week maintenance phase of a randomized, placebo-controlled withdrawal trial in adults with schizophrenia were comparable with those reported in short-term, fixeddose trials for schizophrenia.
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