Strattera

Strattera Adverse Reactions

atomoxetine

Manufacturer:

Eli Lilly

Distributor:

Zuellig Pharma
Full Prescribing Info
Adverse Reactions
Paediatric population: Summary of the safety profile: In paediatric placebo-controlled trials, headache, abdominal pain1 and decreased appetite are the adverse events most commonly associated with atomoxetine, and are reported by about 19%, 18% and 16% of patients respectively, but seldom lead to drug discontinuation (discontinuation rates are 0.1% for headache, 0.2% for abdominal pain and 0.0% for decreased appetite). Abdominal pain and decreased appetite are usually transient.
Associated with decreased appetite, some patients experienced growth retardation early in therapy in terms of both weight and height gain. On average, after an initial decrease in weight and height gain, patients treated with atomoxetine recovered to mean weight and height as predicted by group baseline data over the long-term treatment.
Nausea, vomiting and somnolence2 can occur in about 10% to 11% of patients particularly during the first month of therapy. However, these episodes were usually mild to moderate in severity and transient, and did not result in a significant number of discontinuation from therapy (discontinuation rates ≤0.5%).
In both paediatric and adult placebo-controlled trials, patients taking atomoxetine experienced increases in heart rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressure (see Precautions). Because of its effect on noradrenergic tone, orthostatic hypotension (0.2%) and syncope (0.8%) have been reported in patients taking atomoxetine. Atomoxetine should be used with caution in any condition that may predispose patients to hypotension.
The following table of undesirable effects is based on adverse event reporting and laboratory investigations from clinical trials and post marketing spontaneous reports in children and adolescents: (See Table 3.)
Tabulated list of adverse reactions: Frequency estimate: Very common (≥1/10), common (≥1/100 to <1/10), uncommon (≥1/1,000 to <1/100), rare (≥1/10,000 to <1/1,000), very rare (<1/10,000).

Click on icon to see table/diagram/image

CYP2D6 poor metabolisers (PM): The following adverse events occurred in at least 2% of CYP2D6 poor metaboliser (PM) patients and were statistically significantly more frequent in PM patients compared with CYP2D6 extensive metaboliser (EM) patients: appetite decreased (24.1% of PMs, 17.0% of EMs); insomnia combined (including insomnia, middle insomnia and initial insomnia, 14.9% of PMs, 9.7% of EMs); depression combined (including depression, major depression, depressive symptom, depressed mood and dysphoria, 6.5% of PMs and 4.1% of EMs), weight decreased (7.3% of PMs, 4.4% of EMs), constipation 6.8% of PMs, 4.3% of EMs); tremor (4.5% of PMs, 0.9%of EMs); sedation (3.9% of PMs, 2.1% of EMs); excoriation (3.9% of PMs, 1.7% of EMs); enuresis (3.0% of PMs, 1.2% of EMs); conjunctivitis (2.5% of PMs, 1.2% of EMs); syncope (2.5% of PMs, 0.7% of EMs); early morning awakening (2.3% of PMs, 0.8% of EMs); mydriasis (2.0% of PMs, 0.6% of EMs). The following events did not meet the above criteria but is noteworthy: generalised anxiety disorder (0.8% of PMs and 0.1% of EMs). In addition, in trials lasting up to 10 weeks, weight loss was more pronounced in PM patients (mean of 0.6kg in EM and 1.1kg in PM).
Adults: Summary of the safety profile: In adult ADHD clinical trials, the following system organ classes had the highest frequency of adverse events during treatment with atomoxetine: gastrointestinal, nervous system and psychiatric disorders. The most common adverse events (≥5%) reported were appetite decreased (14.9%), insomnia (11.3%) headache (16.3%), dry mouth (18.4%) and nausea (26.7%). The majority of these events were mild or moderate in severity and the events most frequently reported as severe were nausea, insomnia, fatigue and headache. A complaint of urinary retention or urinary hesitancy in adults should be considered potentially related to atomoxetine.
The following table of undesirable effects is based on adverse event reporting and laboratory investigations from clinical trials and post marketing spontaneous reports in adults. (See Table 4.)
Tabulated list of adverse reactions: Frequency estimate: Very common (≥1/10), common (≥1/100 to <1/10), uncommon (≥1/1,000 to <1/100), rare (≥1/10,000 to <1/1,000), very rare (<1/10,000).

Click on icon to see table/diagram/image

CYP2D6 poor metabolisers (PM): The following adverse events occurred in at least 2% of CYP2D6 poor metaboliser (PM) patients and were statistically significantly more frequent in PM patients compared with CYP2D6 extensive metaboliser (EM) patients: vision blurred (3.9% of PMs, 1.3% of EMs), dry mouth (34.5% of PMs, 17.4% of EMs), constipation (11.3% of PMs, 6.7% of EMs), feeling jittery (4.9% of PMs, 1.9% of EMs), decreased appetite (23.2% of PMs, 14.7% of EMs), tremor (5.4% of PMs, 1.2% of EMs), insomnia (19.2% of PMs, 11.3% of EMs), sleep disorder (6.9% of PMs, 3.4% of EMs), middle insomnia (5.4% of PMs, 2.7% of EMs), terminal insomnia (3% of PMs, 0.9% of EMs), urinary retention (5.9% of PMs, 1.2% of EMs), erectile dysfunction (20.9% of PMs, 8.9% of EMs), ejaculation disorder (6.1% of PMs, 2.2% of EMs), hyperhidrosis (14.8% of PMs, 6.8% of EMs), peripheral coldness (3% of PMs, 0.5% of EMs).
Reporting of suspected adverse reactions: Reporting suspected adverse reactions after authorisation of the medicinal product is important. It allows continued monitoring of the benefit/risk balance of the medicinal product.
Register or sign in to continue
Asia's one-stop resource for medical news, clinical reference and education
Sign up for free
Already a member? Sign in