Xeljanz

Xeljanz Use In Pregnancy & Lactation

tofacitinib

Manufacturer:

Pfizer

Distributor:

Zuellig Pharma
The information highlighted (if any) are the most recent updates for this brand.
Full Prescribing Info
Use In Pregnancy & Lactation
Pregnancy: Risk Summary: Available data with XELJANZ use in pregnant women are insufficient to establish a drug associated risk of major birth defects, miscarriage or adverse maternal or fetal outcomes. There are risks to the mother and the fetus associated with rheumatoid arthritis in pregnancy. In animal reproduction studies, fetocidal and teratogenic effects were noted when pregnant rats and rabbits received tofacitinib during the period of organogenesis at exposures multiples of 73 times. Further, in a peri and post-natal study in rats, tofacitinib resulted in reductions in live litter size, postnatal survival, and pup body weights at exposure multiples of approximately 73 times the recommended dose of 5 mg twice daily (see Data as follows).
Women of reproductive potential should be advised to use effective contraception during treatment with tofacitinib and for at least 4 weeks after the last dose.
The estimated background risks of major birth defects and miscarriage for the indicated populations are unknown. All pregnancies have a background risk of birth defect, loss, or other adverse outcomes. The background risks in the U.S. general population of major birth defects and miscarriages are 2 to 4% and 15 to 20% of clinically recognized pregnancies, respectively.
Clinical Considerations: Disease-associated Maternal and/or Embryo/Fetal Risk: Published data suggest that increased disease activity is associated with the risk of developing adverse pregnancy outcomes in women with rheumatoid arthritis. Adverse pregnancy outcomes include preterm delivery (before 37 weeks of gestation), low birth weight (less than 2500 g) infants, and small for gestational age at birth.
Data: Animal Data: In a rat embryofetal developmental study, in which pregnant rats received tofacitinib during organogenesis, tofacitinib was teratogenic at exposure levels approximately 146 times the recommended dose of 5 mg twice daily (on an AUC basis at oral doses of 100 mg/kg/day in rats). Teratogenic effects consisted of external and soft tissue malformations of anasarca and membranous ventricular septal defects, respectively, and skeletal malformations or variations (absent cervical arch; bent femur, fibula, humerus, radius, scapula, tibia, and ulna; sternoschisis; absent rib; misshapen femur; branched rib; fused rib; fused sternebra; and hemicentric thoracic centrum). In addition, there was an increase in post-implantation loss, consisting of early and late resorptions, resulting in a reduced number of viable fetuses. Mean fetal body weight was reduced. No developmental toxicity was observed in rats at exposure levels approximately 58 times the recommended dose of 5 mg twice daily (on an AUC basis at oral doses of 30 mg/kg/day in pregnant rats).
In a rabbit embryofetal developmental study, in which pregnant rabbits received tofacitinib during the period of organogenesis, tofacitinib was teratogenic at exposure levels approximately 13 times the recommended dose of 5 mg twice daily (on an AUC basis at oral doses of 30 mg/kg/day in rabbits) in the absence of signs of maternal toxicity. Teratogenic effects included thoracogastroschisis, omphalocele, membranous ventricular septal defects, and cranial/skeletal malformations (microstomia, microphthalmia), mid-line and tail defects. In addition, there was an increase in post-implantation loss associated with late resorptions. No developmental toxicity was observed in rabbits at exposure levels approximately 3 times the recommended dose of 5 mg twice daily (on an AUC basis at oral doses of 10 mg/kg/day in pregnant rabbits).
In a peri- and postnatal development study in pregnant rats that received tofacitinib from gestation day 6 through day 20 of lactation, there were reductions in live litter size, postnatal survival, and pup body weights at exposure levels approximately 73 times the recommended dose of 5 mg twice daily (on an AUC basis at oral doses of 50 mg/kg/day in rats). There was no effect on behavioral and learning assessments, sexual maturation or the ability of the F1 generation rats to mate and produce viable F2 generation fetuses in rats at exposure levels approximately 17 times the recommended dose of 5 mg twice daily (on an AUC basis at oral doses of 10 mg/kg/day in rats).
Lactation: Risk Summary: There are no data on the presence of tofacitinib in human milk, the effects on a breastfed infant, or the effects on milk production. Tofacitinib is present in the milk of lactating rats (see Data as follows). When a drug is present in animal milk, it is likely that the drug will be present in human milk. Given the serious adverse reactions seen in adults treated with XELJANZ, such as increased risk of serious infections, advise patients that breastfeeding is not recommended during treatment and for at least 18 hours after the last dose of XELJANZ.
Data: Following administration of tofacitinib to lactating rats, concentrations of tofacitinib in milk over time paralleled those in serum, and were approximately 2 times higher in milk relative to maternal serum at all time points measured.
Females and Males of Reproductive Potential: Contraception: Females: In an animal reproduction study, tofacitinib at AUC multiples of 13 times the recommended dose of 5 mg twice daily demonstrated adverse embryo-fetal findings.
However, there is uncertainty as to how these animal findings relate to females of reproductive potential treated with the recommended clinical dose. Consider pregnancy planning and prevention for females of reproductive potential.
Infertility: Females: Based on findings in rats, treatment with XELJANZ may result in reduced fertility in females of reproductive potential. It is not known if this effect is reversible (see Pharmacology: Toxicology: Non-Clinical Toxicology: Carcinogenesis, Mutagenesis, Impairment of Fertility under Actions).
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