Aspirex

Aspirex

aspirin

Manufacturer:

Favorex

Distributor:

DKSH
Full Prescribing Info
Contents
Aspirin.
Action
Pharmacology: Pharmacokinetics: Absorption: Approximately 80-100% from the gastrointestinal (GI) tract within 5-30 min.
Distribution: Rapidly and widely distributed, apparently into most body tissues and fluids.
Metabolism: Hydrolyzed to salicylate (active) by esterases in GI mucosa, red blood cells, synovial fluid and blood. Metabolism of salicylate occurs primarily by hepatic conjugation; metabolic pathways are saturable.
Half-Life Elimination: Approximately 15-20 min.
Indications/Uses
Secondary prevention of thrombotic cerebrovascular or cardiovascular disease in patients with transient ischemic attacks (TIAs), stroke, acute myocardial infarction (MI), angina pectoris, coronary artery bypass graft (CABG), atrial fibrillation.
Dosage/Direction for Use
1 tab once daily.
Administration: Aspirex is usually administered orally, preferably with food or a large quantity of water or milk to minimize gastric irritation.
Overdosage
Treatment: Salicylate overdose should be emptied in the stomach by lavage. Salicylate remaining in the stomach may be adsorbed by activated charcoal. Fluid and electrolyte management is the mainstay treatment with the immediate aim being correction of acidosis, hyperpyrexia, hypokalemia and dehydration. Alkaline diuresis, haemodialysis or haemoperfusion are effective methods of removing salicylate from the plasma.
Contraindications
History of hypersensitivity to aspirin or any other NSAIDs which includes those in whom attacks of asthma, angioedema, urticaria or rhinitis have been precipitated by aspirin or any other NSAIDs.
In patients with active peptic ulceration, haemophilia and other bleeding disorders.
Use in pregnancy: Salicylates should be used during pregnancy only when the potential benefits justify the possible risks to the fetus. Aspirex generally, should be avoided during the last 3 months (although low dosages have been useful in the prevention of preeclampsia during this period) of pregnancy (especially during the 1-2 weeks before delivery).
Similarly, aspirin in fixed combination with extended-release dipyridamole should be avoided in the 3rd trimester of pregnancy.
Use in lactation: Since salicylates are distributed into milk in low concentrations, Aspirex should be administered with caution to nursing women or should be avoided due to possible risk of Reye's syndrome.
Use in children: Do not use in children and adolescent <18 years due to a potential association with Reye's syndrome.
Special Precautions
Aspirex should be used with caution in patients with active GI lesions (eg, erosive gastritis, peptic ulcer) or with a history of recurrent GI lesions, ulcers, or persistent or recurring stomach disorders (eg, heartburn, stomach pain, dyspepsia). The patient should contact the physician prior to initiating therapy with aspirin. If aspirin must be administered, these patients should be closely monitored for signs of GI bleeding or ulcer perforation.
Use In Pregnancy & Lactation
Use in pregnancy: Salicylates should be used during pregnancy only when the potential benefits justify the possible risks to the fetus. Aspirex generally, should be avoided during the last 3 months (although low dosages have been useful in the prevention of preeclampsia during this period) of pregnancy (especially during the 1-2 weeks before delivery). Similarly, aspirin in fixed combination with extended-release dipyridamole should be avoided in the 3rd trimester of pregnancy.
Use in lactation: Since salicylates are distributed into milk in low concentrations, Aspirex should be administered with caution to nursing women or should be avoided due to possible risk of Reye's syndrome.
Adverse Reactions
Bronchospasm; GI irritation, haemorrhage (occasionally major) also other haemorrhage (eg, subconjunctival).
Drug Interactions
Anticoagulants: Salicylates may enhance the hypoprothrombinemic effect of warfarin and other anticoagulants, and increase the risk of bleeding complications with these agents.
Uricosuric Agents: The uricosuric effect of salicylates and phenylbutazone, probenecid or sulfinpyrazone are antagonistic. Therefore, salicylates are generally contraindicated during uricosuric therapy.
Antidiabetic Agents: The hypoglycemic effect of sulfonylureas (eg, chlorpropamide, tolbutamide) may be enhanced by salicylates.
Corticosteroids: Serum salicylate concentrations may decrease when corticosteroids are administered concomitantly. It may be necessary to increase salicylate dosage when corticosteroids are administered concurrently, or decrease salicylate dosage when corticosteroids are discontinued in patients receiving salicylates.
Methotrexate: Since methotrexate has a low therapeutic index and may produce serious adverse effects, salicylates should be used with extreme caution in patients receiving Aspirex. Geriatric patients and patients with impaired renal functions may be at particular risk. If the drugs are administered concurrently, patients should be carefully monitored for signs of adverse effects of methotrexate. Patients receiving methotrexate should be warned to avoid nonprescription preparations containing salicylates.
Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs): Salicylate is not used in conjunction with other NSAIDs, since it has not been established that combination therapy is more efficacious than the individual agents alone and the potential for adverse effects (particularly GI and renal effects), may be increased.
Storage
Store below 30°C. Protect from light.
MIMS Class
Anticoagulants, Antiplatelets & Fibrinolytics (Thrombolytics)
ATC Classification
B01AC06 - acetylsalicylic acid ; Belongs to the class of platelet aggregation inhibitors excluding heparin. Used in the treatment of thrombosis.
Presentation/Packing
Tab 81 mg (white, uncoated, flat, round, bisected on one side) 10 x 10s.
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