Calcium phosphate


Concise Prescribing Info
Indications/Uses
Dietary supplementation.
Dosage/Direction for Use
Adult : PO 19-50 yr: 1,000 mg elemental Ca/day and >50 yr: 1,200 mg elemental Ca/day.
Dosage Details
Oral
Dietary supplement
Adult: Expressed in terms of elemental calcium: 19-50 yr: 1000 mg/day and >50 yr: 1200 mg/day.
Child: Expressed in terms of elemental calcium: 0-6 mth: 210 mg/day; 7-12 mth: 270 mg/day; 1-3 yr: 500 mg/day; 4-8 yr: 800 mg/day; 9-18 yr: 1300 mg/day.
Contraindications
Conditions associated with hypercalcaemia and hypercalciuria.
Special Precautions
Renal impairment (frequent monitoring of serum calcium and phosphorus is recommended); sarcoidosis; history of nephrolithiasis. Avoid IV admin of calcium in patients on cardiac glycosides. Increased risk of hypercalcaemia and hypercalciuria in hypoparathyroid patients receiving high doses of vitamin D. Caution when used in patients with history of kidney stones. Patients should be advised to administer vitamin D concurrently to optimise calcium absorption. Pregnancy.
Adverse Reactions
Gi discomfort e.g. constipation, nausea, vomiting, bloating and gas. Dry mouth, hypercalcaemia, hypophosphataemia, milk-alkali syndrome.
Drug Interactions
May reduce the efficacy of calcium-channel blockers. Concurrent admin of IV calcium salt with cardiac glycosides may lead to serious adverse events. Increased risk of hypercalcaemia when used with thiazide diuretics. May reduce absorption of tetracycline, alendronate, atenolol, iron, quinolone antibiotics, sodium fluoride and zinc.
Food Interaction
Increased risk of osteoporosis with ethanol.
Action
Description: Calcium phosphate is used to prevent or treat negative calcium balance. It prevents or reduces the rate of bone loss. The calcium in calcium salts aids in nerve and muscle performance and allows normal cardiac function.
Pharmacokinetics:
Absorption: Absorbed largely from the small intestine by active transport and passive diffusion.
Distribution: Crosses the placenta and is distributed into breast milk.
Excretion: Excess calcium is mainly excreted renally. Unabsorbed calcium is removed in the faeces, along with that secreted in the bile and pancreatic juice.
MIMS Class
Disclaimer: This information is independently developed by MIMS based on Calcium phosphate from various references and is provided for your reference only. Therapeutic uses, prescribing information and product availability may vary between countries. Please refer to MIMS Product Monographs for specific and locally approved prescribing information. Although great effort has been made to ensure content accuracy, MIMS shall not be held responsible or liable for any claims or damages arising from the use or misuse of the information contained herein, its contents or omissions, or otherwise. Copyright © 2020 MIMS. All rights reserved. Powered by MIMS.com
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