Thiamine


Generic Medicine Info
Indications and Dosage
Intramuscular
Thiamine deficiency
Adult: 10-20 mg tid up to 2 weeks, followed by oral therapy for 1 month.

Oral
Thiamine deficiency
Adult: Mild cases: 50-100 mg daily. Severe cases: Up to 300 mg daily in divided doses.

Parenteral
Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome
Adult: Initially, 100 mg via slow IV inj over 10 minutes, then 50-100 mg daily via IM or IV inj until the patient is consuming a regular, balanced diet.
Administration
Should be taken with food.
Incompatibility
Alkaline or neutral solutions, oxidising and reducing agents.
Special Precautions
Patient with history of allergic reactions. Pregnancy and lactation.
Adverse Reactions
Significant: Allergic reactions (e.g. tingling, pruritus, urticaria).
Gastrointestinal disorders: Nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea, abdominal pain.
General disorders and administration site conditions: Injection site pain, local irritation, tenderness, induration.
Potentially Fatal: Serious hypersensitivity reactions (IM/IV).
IM/IV/Parenteral/PO: A
Drug Interactions
IV dextrose may worsen acute symptoms of thiamine deficiency. May enhance the effect of neuromuscular blocking agents. Diminished therapeutic effect with etamsylate.
Food Interaction
High carbohydrate diet may increase thiamine requirement.
Lab Interference
May give false-positive results for uric acid using phosphotungstate method, and for urobilinogen using Ehrlich's reagent. High doses of thiamine may interfere with the spectrophotometric determination of serum theophylline concentrations.
Action
Description: Thiamine is a water-soluble vitamin. It combines with ATP to form thiamine pyrophosphate, an essential coenzyme in carbohydrate metabolism.
Synonyms: aneurine.
Pharmacokinetics:
Absorption: Well-absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract after oral administration and rapidly and completely absorbed following IM injection.
Distribution: Widely distributed in most body tissues, with highest concentration in the brain, heart, kidney and liver. Enters breastmilk.
Metabolism: Metabolised in the liver.
Excretion: Via urine as metabolites and unchanged drug.
Chemical Structure

Chemical Structure Image
Thiamine

Source: National Center for Biotechnology Information. PubChem Compound Summary for CID 1130, Thiamine. https://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/compound/Thiamine. Accessed Apr. 28, 2021.

Storage
Store below 25°C. Protect from light.
MIMS Class
Vitamin B-Complex / with C
ATC Classification
A11DA01 - thiamine (vit B1) ; Belongs to the class of vitamin B1. Used as dietary supplements.
References
Anon. Thiamine. Lexicomp Online. Hudson, Ohio. Wolters Kluwer Clinical Drug Information, Inc. https://online.lexi.com. Accessed 07/04/2021.

Benerva 100 mg Tablets (Teofarma S.r.l.). MHRA. https://products.mhra.gov.uk. Accessed 07/04/2021.

Buckingham R (ed). Vitamin B1 Substances. Martindale: The Complete Drug Reference [online]. London. Pharmaceutical Press. https://www.medicinescomplete.com. Accessed 07/04/2021.

Joint Formulary Committee. Thiamine. British National Formulary [online]. London. BMJ Group and Pharmaceutical Press. https://www.medicinescomplete.com. Accessed 07/04/2021.

Thiamine Hydrochloride 100 mg Tablets (Blue Bio Pharmaceuticals Limited). MHRA. https://products.mhra.gov.uk. Accessed 07/04/2021.

Thiamine Hydrochloride 50 mg Tablets (Athlone Pharmaceuticals Limited). MHRA. https://products.mhra.gov.uk. Accessed 07/04/2021.

Thiamine Hydrochloride Injection, Solution (Mylan Institutional LLC). DailyMed. Source: U.S. National Library of Medicine. https://dailymed.nlm.nih.gov/dailymed. Accessed 07/04/2021.

Tyvera 50 mg Tablets (Accord Healthcare Limited). MHRA. https://products.mhra.gov.uk. Accessed 07/04/2021.

Disclaimer: This information is independently developed by MIMS based on Thiamine from various references and is provided for your reference only. Therapeutic uses, prescribing information and product availability may vary between countries. Please refer to MIMS Product Monographs for specific and locally approved prescribing information. Although great effort has been made to ensure content accuracy, MIMS shall not be held responsible or liable for any claims or damages arising from the use or misuse of the information contained herein, its contents or omissions, or otherwise. Copyright © 2021 MIMS. All rights reserved. Powered by MIMS.com
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