Ascozin

Ascozin

Manufacturer:

Kusum Healthcare

Distributor:

Kusum Healthcare
Full Prescribing Info
Contents
Ascorbic acid, zinc.
Description
Each chewable tablet contains: Ascorbic acid USP 100 mg, Sodium ascorbate USP 450 mg (equivalent to ascorbic acid 400 mg), Zinc oxide BP 18.67 mg (equivalent to Zinc 15 mg).
Action
ATC Code: A11GB.
Pharmacology: Pharmacodynamics: Vitamin C: Ascorbic acid is an important water-soluble vitamin and antioxidant. Due to the low storage capacity of the body for vitamin C, a regular intake of sufficient amounts is essential to humans. Ascorbic acid and its metabolite dehydroascorbic acid form a reversible redox system that is involved in many enzymatic reactions and forms the basis for the spectrum of action of vitamin C. Ascorbic acid functions as a cofactor in a number of hydroxylation and amidation reactions by transferring electrons to enzymes that provide reducing equivalents.
The importance of ascorbic acid to the human body is most clearly evident in clinically manifest vitamin C deficiency, i.e. scurvy. Ascorbic acid plays a key role in the production of hydroxyproline from proline, which in turn is essential to the development of functionally active collagen. The symptoms seen in scurvy, such as delayed wound healing, disturbances of bone growth, vascular fragility, and disorders of dentine formation, are the result of impaired collagen formation.
Zinc: As with vitamin C, low levels of zinc may also adversely affect the healing rate of wounds, ulcers and decubitus. Zinc status is of major importance in maintenance of effective immune response, particularly T-cell-mediated response.
Pharmacokinetics: Absorption: Ascorbic acid is absorbed primarily in the upper part of the small intestine via sodium-dependent active transport. When ascorbic acid is present in high concentrations, uptake occurs by means of passive diffusion. After oral administration of doses of 1-12 g, the proportion of ascorbic acid absorbed falls from approximately 50% to about 15%, though the absolute quantity of substance taken up continues to increase. Zinc is absorbed all along the small intestine. The absorption of zinc (ionic) administered in solution on an empty stomach ranges from 41-79%, while the zinc present in food or that given as a supplement with meals is absorbed in the range of 10-40%.
Distribution: Plasma protein binding of ascorbic acid is approximately 24%. Serum concentrations are normally 10 mg/l (60 μmol/l). Concentrations below 6 mg/l (35 μmol/l) indicate that the intake of vitamin C is not always adequate, and concentrations below 4 mg/l (20 μmol/l) indicate that the intake is actually inadequate. In clinically manifest scurvy, serum concentrations are below 2 mg/l (10 μmol/l). Total body zinc content is controlled in part by regulating the efficiency of intestinal absorption and the excretion from endogenous zinc pools to maintain zinc homeostasis. The adult total body zinc content ranges from about 2.3 mmol (1.5 g) in women to 3.8 mmol (2.5 g) in men. Zinc is present in all organs, tissues, fluids, and secretions of the body. Zinc is primarily an intracellular ion, with well over 95% of the total-body zinc found within cells. Zinc is associated with all organelles of the cell, but about 60 to 80% of the cellular zinc is found in the cytosol.
Metabolism: Ascorbic acid is metabolised partly via dehydroascorbic acid to oxalic acid and other products. When ingested in excessive quantities, however, ascorbic acid is largely excreted in unchanged form in the urine and faeces. Ascorbic-acid-2-sulphate also appears as a metabolite in the urine.
Elimination: The physiological body pool of ascorbic acid is about 1500 mg. The elimination half-life of ascorbic acid depends on the route of administration, the quantity administered and the rate of absorption. Following an oral dose of 1 g the half-life is about 13 hours. When 1-3 g vitamin C /day is taken, the main route of excretion is renal. With doses exceeding 3 g, increasing quantities are excreted unchanged in the faeces. The major route for endogenous zinc excretion is into the gastrointestinal tract with ultimate loss in the faeces. When tracer doses of zinc are given either orally or intravenously, only about 2 to 10% is recovered in the urine; the remainder is lost in the faeces. In humans, endogenous faecal losses may range from <15 μmol/day (1 mg/day) with extremely low intakes to over 80 μmol/day (5 mg/day) with extremely high intakes. Normally, about 6 to 9 μmol (400 to 600 μg) of zinc is excreted daily in the urine.
Indications/Uses
Indicated for the treatment of ascorbic acid and zinc deficiency.
Dosage/Direction for Use
Adults and adolescents should take one chewable tablet daily.
Overdosage
Cause of overdose have not been reported. Symptoms of overdose may include gastrointestinal disturbance, such diarrhoea and abdominal discomfort.
Contraindications
Known allergy or hypersensitivity to the active substances or to any of the excipients of Ascozin chewable tablets.
Hypercalcemia.; hypermagnesemia; nephrolithiasis/urolithiasis; hemochromatosis.
Ascorbic acid should not be given to patients with hyperoxaluria, reduced renal function or deficiency of glucose-6-phophate dedydrogenase.
Special Precautions
Ascozin contains a source of phenylalanine and, therefore, may be harmful to people with phenylketonuria.
The recommended daily dose of one tablet per day must not be exceeded.
It should only be used for the treatment of vitamin C deficiency if the cause is dietary.
Patients receiving any other medication or those under medical care should consult a physician before taking this medicinal product. Patients with rare hereditary problems of galactose intolerance the lapp lactase deficiency or glucose-galactose malabsorption should not take Ascozin Chewable tablets.
Effects on ability to drive and use machines: No studies on the effect of Ascozin containing medicinal products on the ability to drive or use machines have been performed.
Use In Pregnancy & Lactation
No teratogenicity study in animals is available.
Clinical observations of a great number of exposed pregnant women have not shown any malformative or toxic effect of Ascozin chewable tablets on the foetus. However, only epidemiological studies could check the absence of any risk.
Consequently, Ascozin chewable tablets should only be used during pregnancy if necessary. The vitamin and mineral of Ascozin chewable tablets are excreted in the milk, but harmful effect on the child are unlikely at the therapeutic doses.
Adverse Reactions
The most commonly found adverse reactions are mild transient multivitamin/mineral gastrointestinal disturbances (>=1/100 - <1/10).
Allergic reactions are very rare (<1/10,000). Urticaria, throat swelling and rash have been reported in isolate cases.
Ascorbic acid may cause haemolytic anaemia in certain individuals with a deficiency of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase.
Drug Interactions
At high doses (more than 2 g/day) vitamin C may interfere with the following biological tests: plasmatic and urinary dosages of creatinine and glucose (control with glucose-oxydase device) as well as with tests for occult bleeding in stool.
Storage
Store at temperatures not exceeding 30°C.
MIMS Class
ATC Classification
A11GB - Ascorbic acid (vitamin C), combinations ; Used as dietary supplements.
Presentation/Packing
Chewable tab (light orange coloured uniformly spotted circular biconvex) 30's, 100's.
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