Rhea Calcium Ascorbate + Zinc

Rhea Calcium Ascorbate + Zinc

Manufacturer:

Interphil

Distributor:

Philusa
Full Prescribing Info
Contents
Calcium ascorbate, zinc.
Description
Each capsule contains: Calcium Ascorbate Dihydrate 605.2 mg (Equivalent to Calcium Ascorbate 554 mg), Zinc Gluconate 30 mg (Equivalent to Zinc 4.3 mg).
Action
Pharmacology: Pharmacokinetics: Ascorbic acid is readily absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract and is widely distributed in the body tissues. Plasma concentration of ascorbic acid rise as the dose ingested is increased until a plateau is reached with doses of about 90 to 150 mg daily. Body stores of ascorbic acid in healthy individuals are about 1.5 g although more may be stored at intakes above 200 mg daily.
Ascorbic acid is reversibly oxidized to dehydroascorbic acid (which is less likely to happen when chelated with calcium or zinc as in this formula); some is metabolized to ascorbate-2-sulfate, which is inactive, and oxalic acid which are excreted in the urine.
Ascorbic acid in excess of the body's need is also rapidly eliminated unchanged in the urine; this generally occurs with intakes exceeding 100 mg daily.
Indications/Uses
Ascorbic acid, a water-soluble vitamin, is essential for the synthesis of collagen and intercellular material. Deficiency develops when the dietary intake is inadequate since humans are unable to form their own ascorbic acid. Thus, ascorbic acid is normally given orally in the treatment and prevention of deficiency.
Zinc is an essential element of nutrition and traces are present in a wide range of foods. It is a constituent of many enzyme systems and is present in all tissues. Features of zinc deficiency include growth retardation and defects of rapidly-dividing tissues such as the skin, the immune system, and the intestinal mucosa.
Dosage/Direction for Use
Dosage must be adjusted to the individual needs of each patient. One capsule is normally sufficient. Additional capsule(s) may be required and should be given properly spaced throughout the day. Best taken with food.
Overdosage
In acute overdosage, zinc salts are corrosive, due to the formation of zinc chloride by stomach acid, treatment consists of giving milk or alkali carbonates and activated charcoal.
Adverse Reactions
Ascorbic acid is usually well tolerated. Large doses are reported to cause diarrhea and other gastrointestinal disturbance. Milder effects are observed with calcium salt. Large doses may result in hyperoxaluria and the formation of renal calcium oxalate calculi and ascorbic acid should therefore be given with care to patients with hyperoxaluria. Large doses have resulted in haemolysis in patients with G6PD deficiency.
The most frequent adverse effects of oral zinc gluconate are gastrointestinal and include abdominal pain, dyspepsia, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, gastric irritation, and gastritis. These are particularly common if taken on an empty stomach, and may be reduced by giving them meals.
Drug Interactions
The absorption of zinc may be reduced by iron supplements, penicillamine, phosphorous-containing preparations, and tetracyclines. Zinc supplements reduce the absorption of copper, fluoroquinolones, iron, penicillamine, and tetracyclines.
Absorption of zinc from the gastrointestinal tract is incomplete, and is reduced in the presence of some dietary constituents such as phytates. Bioavailability of dietary zinc varies widely from about 20 to 30% but it highest in the presence of chelate-forming ions like ascorbate and gluconate.
Storage
Store at temperatures not exceeding 30°C.
ATC Classification
A11GB - Ascorbic acid (vitamin C), combinations ; Used as dietary supplements.
Presentation/Packing
Softgel cap 30's.
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