Zeenate

Zeenate

Manufacturer:

Aurochem Lab

Distributor:

Endure Medical
Full Prescribing Info
Contents
Zinc sulphate monohydrate.
Description
Each orodispersible tablet contains Zinc Sulphate Monohydrate equivalent to Elemental Zinc 20 mg.
Action
Pharmacology: Pharmacokinetics: Absorption of zinc from the gastrointestinal tract is incomplete, and is reduced in the presence of some dietary constituents such as phytates. Bioavailability of dietary zinc varies widely between different sources, but is about 20 to 30%. Zinc is distributed throughout the body with the highest concentrations found in muscle, bone, skin, eye, and prostatic fluids. It is primarily excreted in the faeces, and regulation of faecal losses is important in zinc homoeostasis. Small amounts are lost in urine and perspiration.
Indications/Uses
Zinc is an essential element of nutrition and traces are present in a wide range of foods. It is a constituent of many enzyme systems and is present in all tissues. Features of zinc deficiency include growth retardation and defects of rapidly-dividing tissues such as the skin, the immune system, and the intestinal mucosa. Water-soluble zinc salts are used as supplements to correct zinc deficiency; for example, in malabsorption syndromes, during parenteral feeding, in conditions with increased body losses (trauma, burns, and protein-losing states), and in acrodermatitis enteropathica (a rare genetic disorder characterised by severe zinc deficiency). They have been tried in the treatment of a large number of conditions that may be related to zinc deficiency.
Dosage/Direction for Use
In deficiency states, zinc is usually given orally as the sulfate, the sulfate monohydrate, or the gluconate, in doses of up to 50 mg of elemental zinc three times daily. When intravenous supplements are required, zinc chloride or zinc sulfate may be given; a suggested dose for parenteral nutrition is 6.5 mg of elemental zinc (100 micromoles) daily. Oral zinc salts, commonly the acetate, may be used as copper absorption inhibitors in Wilson's disease. The usual adult dose is 50 mg three times daily up to a maximum of five times daily. Children from 1 to 6 years may be given 25 mg twice daily; those from 6 to 16 years and with a body-weight under 57 kg are given 25 mg three times daily. Adolescents from 16 years of age, or with a body-weight of above 57 kg are given 50 mg three times daily. An effective dose in pregnant women is usually 25 mg three times daily; however, dosage is adjusted based on copper concentrations.
Do NOT chew, break, or split the tablet. Place Dispersible Tablets on the tongue until it completely disintegrates and then swallow it. It may take approximately one minute for the tablet to disintegrate on the tongue. Tablet may be taken with or without water.
Special Precautions
Prolonged use of high doses of zinc supplements, orally or parenterally, leads to copper deficiency with associated sideroblastic anaemia and neutropenia; full blood counts and serum cholesterol should be monitored to detect early signs of copper deficiency. Zinc toxicity has occurred after the use of contaminated water in haemodialysis solutions. High serum zinc concentrations may be reduced by using a chelating drug such as sodium calcium edetate (p.1462). Metal fume fever is an occupational disease associated with inhalation of freshly-oxidised metal fumes, most commonly from zinc, iron or copper. It is characterised by chills, fever, cough, dyspnoea, myalgia. and chest pain, and is generally self-limiting and does not appear to be associated with long term sequelae.
Adverse Reactions
The most frequent adverse effects of zinc salts (the gluconate and sulfate) given orally are gastrointestinal and include abdominal pain, dyspepsia, nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea, gastric irritation, and gastritis. These are particularly common if zinc salts are taken on an empty stomach, and may be reduced by giving them with meals.
Treatment of Adverse Effects: Formation of zinc chloride by stomach acid; treatment consists of giving milk or alkali carbonates and activated charcoal. The use of emetics or gastric lavage should be avoided.
Drug Interactions
The absorption of zinc may be reduced by iron supplements, penicillamine, phosphorus-containing preparations, and tetracyclines. Zinc supplements reduce the absorption of copper, fluoroquinolones and Metal ions, iron, penicillamine, and tetracyclines.
Storage
Store at temperatures not exceeding 30°C.
ATC Classification
A12CB - Zinc ; Used as dietary supplements.
Presentation/Packing
Orodispersible tab 20 mg x 100's.
Register or sign in to continue
Asia's one-stop resource for medical news, clinical reference and education
Sign up for free
Already a member? Sign in