Darzalex

Darzalex Adverse Reactions

daratumumab

Manufacturer:

Janssen-Cilag

Distributor:

DKSH
Full Prescribing Info
Adverse Reactions
The following clinically significant adverse reactions are also described elsewhere in the labeling: Infusion reactions [see Infusion Reactions].
Neutropenia [see Neutropenia].
Thrombocytopenia [see Thrombocytopenia].
Clinical Trials Experience: Because clinical trials are conducted under widely varying conditions, adverse reaction rates observed in the clinical trials of a drug cannot be directly compared to rates in the clinical trials of another drug and may not reflect the rates observed in practice.
The safety data described as follows reflects exposure to DARZALEX (16 mg/kg) in 2,066 patients with multiple myeloma including 1,910 patients who received DARZALEX in combination with background regimens and 156 patients who received DARZALEX as monotherapy.
Newly Diagnosed Multiple Myeloma Ineligible for Autologous Stem Cell Transplant: Combination Treatment with Lenalidomide and Dexamethasone (DRd): Adverse reactions described in the table below reflect exposure to DARZALEX for a median treatment duration of 25.3 months (range: 0.1 to 40.44 months) for the daratumumab-lenalidomide-dexamethasone(DRd) group and median treatment duration of 21.3 months (range: 0.03 to 40.64 months) for the lenalidomide-dexamethasone group (Rd) in a Phase 3 active-controlled study MAIA. The most frequent (≥20%) adverse reactions were infusion reactions, diarrhea, constipation, nausea, peripheral edema, fatigue, back pain, asthenia, pyrexia, upper respiratory tract infection, bronchitis, pneumonia, decreased appetite, muscle spasms, peripheral sensory neuropathy, dyspnea and cough. Serious adverse reactions with a 2% greater incidence in the DRd arm compared to the Rd arm were pneumonia (DRd 15% vs Rd 8%), bronchitis (DRd 4% vs Rd 2%) and dehydration (DRd 2% vs Rd <1%). (See Table 13.)

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Laboratory abnormalities worsening during treatment from baseline listed in Table 14. (See Table 14.)

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Combination Treatment with Bortezomib, Melphalan and Prednisone: Adverse reactions described in Table 15 reflect exposure to DARZALEX for a median treatment duration of 14.7 months (range: 0 to 25.8 months) for the daratumumab, bortezomib, melphalan and prednisone (D-VMP) group, and median treatment duration of 12 months (range: 0.1 to 14.9 months) for the VMP group in a Phase 3 active-controlled study ALCYONE. The most frequent adverse reactions (≥20% with at least 5% greater frequency in the D-VMP arm) were infusion reactions, upper respiratory tract infection and edema peripheral. Serious adverse reactions with at least a 2% greater incidence in the D-VMP arm compared to the VMP arm were pneumonia (D-VMP11% vs VMP 4%), upper respiratory tract infection (D-VMP 5% vs VMP 1%), and pulmonary edema (D-VMP 2% vs VMP 0%). (See Table 15.)

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Laboratory abnormalities worsening during treatment from baseline listed in Table 16. (See Table 16.)

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Newly Diagnosed Multiple Myeloma Eligible for Autologous Stem Cell Transplant: Combination Treatment with Bortezomib, Thalidomide and Dexamethasone (DVTd): Adverse reactions described in Table 17 reflect exposure to DARZALEX up to day 100 post-transplant in a Phase 3 active-controlled study CASSIOPEIA [see Pharmacology: Pharmacodynamics: Clinical Studies under Actions]. The median duration of induction/ASCT/consolidation treatment was 8.9 months (range: 7.0 to 12.0 months) for the DVTd group and 8.7 months (range: 6.4 to 11.5 months) for the VTd group. The most frequent adverse reactions (>20% with at least 5% greater frequency in the DVTd group) were infusion reactions, nausea, pyrexia, upper respiratory tract infection and bronchitis. Serious adverse reactions with a 2% greater incidence in the DVTd arm compared to the VTd arm were bronchitis (DVTd 2% vs VTd <1%) and pneumonia (DVTd 6% vs VTd 4%). (See Table 17.)

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Note: Hematology laboratory related toxicities were excluded and reported separately in the table as follows. (See Table 18.)

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Relapsed/Refractory Multiple Myeloma: Combination Treatment with Lenalidomide and Dexamethasone: Adverse reactions described in Table 19 reflect exposure to DARZALEX for a median treatment duration of 13.1 months (range: 0 to 20.7 months) for the daratumumab-lenalidomide-dexamethasone (DRd) group and median treatment duration of 12.3 months (range: 0.2 to 20.1 months) for the lenalidomide-dexamethasone (Rd) group in a Phase 3 active-controlled study POLLUX. The most frequent adverse reactions (≥20%) were infusion reactions, diarrhea, nausea, fatigue, pyrexia, upper respiratory tract infection, muscle spasms, cough and dyspnea. The overall incidence of serious adverse reactions was 49% for the DRd group compared with 42% for the Rd group. Serious adverse reactions with at least a 2% greater incidence in the DRd arm compared to the Rd arm were pneumonia (DRd 12% vs Rd 10%), upper respiratory tract infection (DRd 7% vs Rd 4%), influenza and pyrexia (DRd 3% vs Rd 1% for each).
Adverse reactions resulted in discontinuations for 7% (n=19) of patients in the DRd arm versus 8% (n=22) in the Rd arm. (See Table 19.)

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Laboratory abnormalities worsening during treatment from baseline listed in Table 20. (See Table 20.)

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Combination Treatment with Bortezomib and Dexamethasone: Adverse reactions described in Table 14 reflect exposure to DARZALEX for a median treatment duration of 6.5 months (range: 0 to 14.8 months) in the daratumumab-bortezomib-dexamethasone (DVd) group and median treatment duration of 5.2 months (range: 0.2 to 8.0 months) for the bortezomib-dexamethasone (Vd) group in a Phase 3 active-controlled study CASTOR. The most frequent adverse reactions (>20%) were infusion reactions, diarrhea, peripheral edema, upper respiratory tract infection, peripheral sensory neuropathy, cough and dyspnea. The overall incidence of serious adverse reactions was 42% for the DVd group compared with 34% for the Vd group. Serious adverse reactions with at least a 2% greater incidence in the DVd arm compared to the Vd arm were upper respiratory tract infection (DVd 5% vs Vd 2%), diarrhea and atrial fibrillation (DVd 2% vs Vd 0% for each).
Adverse reactions resulted in discontinuations for 7% (n=18) of patients in the DVd arm versus 9% (n=22) in the Vd arm. (See Table 21.)

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Laboratory abnormalities worsening during treatment are listed in Table 22. (See Table 22.)

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Combination Treatment with Pomalidomide and Dexamethasone: Adverse reactions described in Table 23 reflect exposure to DARZALEX, pomalidomide and dexamethasone (DPd) for a median treatment duration of 6 months (range: 0.03 to 16.9 months) in EQUULEUS. The most frequent adverse reactions (>20%) were infusion reactions, diarrhea, constipation, nausea, vomiting, fatigue, pyrexia, upper respiratory tract infection, muscle spasms, back pain, arthralgia, dizziness, insomnia, cough and dyspnea. The overall incidence of serious adverse reactions was 49%. Serious adverse reactions reported in ≥5% patients included pneumonia (7%). Adverse reactions resulted in discontinuations for 13% of patients. (See Table 23.)

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Laboratory abnormalities worsening during treatment are listed in Table 24. (See Table 24.)

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Monotherapy: The safety data reflect exposure to DARZALEX in 156 adult patients with relapsed and refractory multiple myeloma treated with DARZALEX at 16 mg/kg in three open-label, clinical trials. The median duration of exposure was 3.3 months (range: 0.03 to 20.04 months). Serious adverse reactions were reported in 51 (33%) patients. The most frequent serious adverse reactions were pneumonia (6%), general physical health deterioration (3%), and pyrexia (3%).
Adverse reactions resulted in treatment delay for 24 (15%) patients, most frequently for infections. Adverse reactions resulted in discontinuations for 6 (4%) patients.
Adverse reactions occurring in at least 10% of patients are presented in Table 25. Table 26 describes Grade 3-4 laboratory abnormalities reported at a rate of ≥10%. (See Tables 25 and 26.)

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Infusion Reactions: In clinical trials (monotherapy and combination treatments; N=2,066) the incidence of any grade infusion reactions was 37% with the first (16 mg/kg, Week 1) infusion of DARZALEX, 2% with the Week 2 infusion, and cumulatively 6% with subsequent infusions. Less than 1% of patients had a Grade 3/4 infusion reaction at Week 2 or subsequent infusions.
The median time to onset of a reaction was 1.5 hours (range: 0 to 72.8 hours). The incidence of infusion modification due to reactions was 36%. Median durations of 16 mg/kg infusions for the 1st week, 2nd week and subsequent infusions were approximately 7, 4, and 3 hours respectively.
Severe infusion reactions included bronchospasm, dyspnea, laryngeal edema, pulmonary edema, hypoxia, and hypertension. Other adverse infusion reactions included nasal congestion, cough, chills, throat irritation, vomiting and nausea.
When DARZALEX dosing was interrupted in the setting of ASCT (Study CASSIOPEIA) for a median of 3.75 months (range: 2.4; 6.9 months), upon re-initiation of DARZALEX the incidence of IRRs was 11% for the first infusion following ASCT. Infusion rate/dilution volume used upon re-initiation was that used for the last DARZALEX infusion prior to interruption for ASCT. IRRs occurring at re-initiation of DARZALEX following ASCT were consistent in terms of symptoms and severity (Grade 3 or 4:<1%) with those reported in previous studies at Week 2 or subsequent infusions.
In EQUULEUS, patients receiving daratumumab combination treatment (n=97) were administered the first 16 mg/kg daratumumab dose at Week 1 split over two days i.e. 8 mg/kg on Day 1 and Day 2 respectively. The incidence of any grade infusion-related reactions was 42%, with 36% of patients experiencing infusion reactions on Day 1 of Week 1, 4% on Day 2 of Week 1, and 8% with subsequent infusions. The median time to onset of a reaction was 1.8 hours (range: 0.1 to 5.4 hours). The incidence of infusion interruptions due to reactions was 30%. Median durations of infusions were 4.2 h for Week 1-Day 1, 4.2 h for Week 1-Day 2, and 3.4 hours for the subsequent infusions.
Herpes Zoster Virus Reactivation: Prophylaxis for Herpes Zoster Virus reactivation was recommended for patients in some clinical trials of DARZALEX. In monotherapy studies, herpes zoster was reported in 3% of patients. In the combination therapy studies, herpes zoster was reported in 2-5% of patients receiving DARZALEX.
Infections: In patients receiving DARZALEX combination therapy, Grade 3 or 4 infections were reported as follows: Relapsed/refractory patient studies: DVd: 21%, Vd: 19%; DRd: 27%, Rd: 23%; DPd: 28%.
Newly diagnosed patient studies: D-VMP: 23%, VMP: 15%; DRd: 32%, Rd: 23%; DVTd: 22%; VTd 20%.
Pneumonia was the most commonly reported severe (Grade 3 or 4) infection across studies. In the active controlled studies, discontinuations from treatment due to infections (1-4%) and fatal infections were generally infrequent and balanced between the DARZALEX containing regimens and active control arms. Fatal infections were primarily due to pneumonia and sepsis.
Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) Reactivation: Hepatitis B virus reactivation has been reported in less than 1% of patients (including fatal cases) treated with DARZALEX in clinical trials.
Immunogenicity: As with all therapeutic proteins, there is the potential for immunogenicity. The detection of antibody formation is highly dependent on the sensitivity and specificity of the assay. Additionally, the observed incidence of antibody (including neutralizing antibody) positivity in an assay may be influenced by several factors including assay methodology, sample handling, timing of sample collection, concomitant medications, and underlying disease. For these reasons, comparison of the incidence of antibodies to daratumumab in the studies described below with the incidence of antibodies in other studies or to other products may be misleading. In clinical trials of patients with multiple myeloma treated with DARZALEX as monotherapy or as combination therapies, none of the 111 evaluable monotherapy patients, and 2 of the 1,050 evaluable combination therapy patients, tested positive for anti-daratumumab antibodies. One patient administered DARZALEX as combination therapy, developed transient neutralizing antibodies against daratumumab. However, this assay has limitations in detecting anti-daratumumab antibodies in the presence of high concentrations of daratumumab; therefore, the incidence of antibody development might not have been reliably determined.
Postmarketing Experience: The following adverse reactions have been identified during post-approval use of DARZALEX. Because these reactions are reported voluntarily from a population of uncertain size, it is not always possible to reliably estimate their frequency or establish a causal relationship to drug exposure.
Immune System disorders: Anaphylactic reaction.
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