Ventolin Nebules

Ventolin Nebules Liều dùng/Hướng dẫn sử dụng

salbutamol

Nhà sản xuất:

GlaxoSmithKline
Thông tin kê toa chi tiết tiếng Anh
Dosage/Direction for Use
VENTOLIN has a duration of action of 4 to 6 hours in most patients.
VENTOLIN Nebules are intended to be used undiluted. However, if prolonged delivery time is desirable (more than 10 minutes) dilution using sterile normal saline as a diluent may be required.
VENTOLIN Nebules are to be used with a nebuliser, under the direction of a physician.
Increasing use of beta2 agonists may be a sign of worsening asthma. Under these conditions a reassessment of the patient's therapy plan may be required and concomitant glucocorticosteroid therapy should be considered.
Delivery of the aerosol may be by facemask, 'T' piece or via an endotracheal tube. Intermittent positive pressure ventilation may be used but is rarely necessary. When there is a risk of anoxia through hypoventilation, oxygen should be added to the inspired air.
As there may be adverse effects associated with excessive dosing, the dosage or frequency of administration should only be increased on medical advice.
As many nebulisers operate on a continuous flow basis, it is likely that nebulised drug will be released in the local environment. VENTOLIN nebules should therefore be administered in a well ventilated room, particularly in hospitals when several patients may be using nebulisers in the same space at the same time.
Adults and Children: A suitable starting dose of salbutamol by wet inhalation is 2.5 milligrams.
This may be increased to 5 milligrams. Treatment may be repeated four times daily. In adults higher dosing, up to 40 milligrams per day, can be given under strict medical supervision in hospital for the treatment of severe airways obstruction.
Clinical efficacy of nebulised VENTOLIN in infants under 18 months is uncertain. As transient hypoxaemia may occur, supplemental oxygen therapy should be considered.
Administration: The solution must not be injected, or swallowed.
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