Starxon

Starxon

ceftriaxone

Manufacturer:

Interbat
Full Prescribing Info
Contents
Ceftriaxone.
Action
Ceftriaxone is a 3rd-generation cephalosporin that inhibits synthesis of mucopeptide on cell wall of microorganisms. It is highly stable against β-lactamase, both penicillinase and cephalosporinase, of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria.
Indications/Uses
Lower respiratory tract and genitourinary tract infections; septicaemia; skin and skin structure, intra-abdominal and bone and joint infections. Prophylaxis of presurgical infection.
Dosage/Direction for Use
Adults and Children >12 years: 1-2 g once daily (every 24 hrs). Infants and Children (3 weeks to 12 years): 20-80 mg/kg body weight/day. Neonates: 20-50 mg/kg body weight once daily.
No dose adjustments are necessary in patients with renal or liver dysfunctions. However, concentration of ceftriaxone in blood should be monitored in patients with severe renal impairment (ie, dialysis patients) and patients with both hepatic and renal impairment. Administration: IM Injection: Dissolve 1 g ceftriaxone with 3.6 mL of 1% lidocaine sterile solution. After reconstitution, each mL contains 250 mg ceftriaxone.
IV Injection: Dissolve 1 g ceftriaxone with 10 mL water for injection. After reconstitution, each mL of solution contains 100 mg ceftriaxone.
Contraindications
Patients with hypersensitivity to cephalosporins.
Special Precautions
Before administration of Starxon, any hypersensitivity to cephalosporins and penicillin should be determined. Starxon is excreted via gallbladder and kidneys, therefore, monitoring of serum level in patients with renal dysfunction should be done. Caution must be exercised in patients with history of gastrointestinal disease, especially colitis. Prothrombin time should be monitored in patients with vitamin K synthesis disorders or lower intake of vitamin K. Prolonged treatment may result in overgrowth of nonsensitive microorganisms. If superinfections occur, administration should be discontinued and appropriate therapy must be implemented. Pseudomembranous colitis has been reported with the use of antibacterial agents, including ceftriaxone, therefore, the diagnosis should be reconsidered if diarrhoea occurs.
Use in pregnancy & lactation: Starxon may be used in pregnant women only if strictly indicated. Use with caution in nursing mothers, as ceftriaxone passes into breast milk.
Use in children: Safety and effectiveness in neonates, infants and children have been determined according to the recommended doses. Administration must be done with caution in neonates with hyperbilirubinemia, especially premature babies.
Use In Pregnancy & Lactation
Starxon may be used in pregnant women only if strictly indicated. Use with caution in nursing mothers, as ceftriaxone passes into breast milk.
Side Effects
Haematologic disorders, hypersensitivity reaction and gastrointestinal tract disorders may occur.
Drug Interactions
Concomitant administration with a high dose of probenecid (1 or 2 g/day) may increase serum clearance of ceftriaxone by approximately 30% and decrease elimination t½ by about 20%. In vitro studies indicated that the antibacterial activity of ceftriaxone and aminoglycosides (amikacin, gentamicin, tobramycin) may be additive or synergistic against some strains of Enterobacteriaceae and some strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.
MIMS Class
ATC Classification
J01DD04 - ceftriaxone ; Belongs to the class of third-generation cephalosporins. Used in the systemic treatment of infections.
Presentation/Packing
Vial 1 g x 1's.
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