Durabeta

Durabeta

atenolol

Manufacturer:

Berlin

Distributor:

Littman
Full Prescribing Info
Contents
Atenolol.
Action
Beta-adrenoceptor blocker.
Pharmacokinetics: Atenolol is incompletely absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract; following oral administration, about 50% is absorbed. Peak plasma concentrations of up to 2 mcg/mL are reached in 2-4 hrs. Atenolol has low lipid solubility. It crosses the placenta and is excreted in breast milk where concentrations higher than those in maternal plasma have been achieved. Only small amounts are reported to cross the blood-brain barrier, and plasma protein-binding is minimal. The plasma half-life is about 6-7 hrs. Atenolol undergoes little or no hepatic metabolism and is excreted mainly in the urine.
Pregnancy and the Neonate: In 6 women who had taken atenolol for at least 6 days up to the time of delivery, concentrations of atenolol in maternal and umbilical serum were approximately equal. Furthermore, in a woman who had discontinued treatment 1 day before delivery, atenolol was not found in maternal or umbilical serum. The half-life of atenolol in neonates born to mothers who had been receiving atenolol ranged from 10.5-34.6 hrs (mean 16.1 hrs) in a study of 35 term infants. Atenolol concentrations were determined in cord blood and in neonatal blood 24 hrs after delivery. The range of elimination rate was 4 times slower than in adults, a difference expected based on renal excretion of atenolol.
Atenolol diffuses into breast milk and is present in milk in concentrations similar to or higher than those in maternal blood. Bradycardia associated with ingestion of atenolol in breast milk has been reported in a 5-day old term infant. The baby improved when breastfeeding was discontinued.
Indications/Uses
Hypertension, angina pectoris due to coronary atherosclerosis and arrhythmia.
Dosage/Direction for Use
Adults: Hypertension: Therapy should be initiated with 50 mg of atenolol daily. This may be increased up to a maximum of 100 mg/day in divided doses. Where patients are controlled in daily doses of 50-100 mg, this may be given once daily. Doses >100 mg daily should be given on a divided basis. When necessary, a further reduction in blood pressure may be achieved by combining atenolol with other antihypertensive agents. Patients can be transferred to atenolol from other antihypertensive treatments with exception of clonidine.
Angina Pectoris: Therapy should be initiated with 50 mg of atenolol daily. This may be increased, if required, to 100 mg daily given as a single or divided dose.
Cardiac Dysrhythmias: Having controlled dysrhythmias with IV atenolol, a suitable oral maintenance dosage of 50-100 mg daily should be given or as prescribed by the physician.
Contraindications
Asthma, heart failure, 2nd- and 3rd-degree heart block, and cardiogenic shock.
Special Precautions
Use in pregnancy: Safety in pregnancy has not been established, therefore, atenolol is not recommended for use in pregnant women or those likely to become pregnant, unless the expected benefit outweighs the potential risk. Atenolol has been used effectively under close supervision for the treatment of pregnancy-associated hypertension. There was no evidence of any fetal abnormalities, although atenolol was generally given after 20 weeks of gestation.
Use in children: There is no experience of atenolol with children.
Use In Pregnancy & Lactation
Atenolol crosses the placenta and is excreted in breast milk where concentrations higher than those in maternal plasma have been achieved.
Pregnancy and the Neonate: In 6 women who had taken atenolol for at least 6 days up to the time of delivery, concentrations of atenolol in maternal and umbilical serum were approximately equal. Furthermore, in a woman who had discontinued treatment 1 day before delivery, atenolol was not found in maternal or umbilical serum. The half-life of atenolol in neonates born to mothers who had been receiving atenolol ranged from 10.5-34.6 hrs (mean 16.1 hrs) in a study of 35 term infants. Atenolol concentrations were determined in cord blood and in neonatal blood 24 hrs after delivery. The range of elimination rate was 4 times slower than in adults, a difference expected based on renal excretion of atenolol.
Atenolol diffuses into breast milk and is present in milk in concentrations similar to or higher than those in maternal blood. Bradycardia associated with ingestion of atenolol in breast milk has been reported in a 5-day old term infant. The baby improved when breastfeeding was discontinued.
Use in pregnancy: Safety in pregnancy has not been established, therefore, atenolol is not recommended for use in pregnant women or those likely to become pregnant, unless the expected benefit outweighs the potential risk. Atenolol has been used effectively under close supervision for the treatment of pregnancy-associated hypertension. There was no evidence of any fetal abnormalities, although atenolol was generally given after 20 weeks of gestation.
Adverse Reactions
Bradycardia, heart failure, bronchospasm, peripheral vasoconstriction, gastrointestinal disturbances, fatigue and sleep disturbances may occur.
Storage
Store at a temperature not exceeding 30°C.
Shelf-Life: 2 years.
MIMS Class
ATC Classification
C07AB03 - atenolol ; Belongs to the class of selective beta-blocking agents. Used in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases.
Presentation/Packing
Tab 50 mg x 100's.
Register or sign in to continue
Asia's one-stop resource for medical news, clinical reference and education
Sign up for free
Already a member? Sign in